Vulnerabilities / Threats

1/9/2019
09:00 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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6 Ways to Beat Back BEC Attacks

Don't assume your employees know how to spot business email compromises - they need some strong training and guidance on how to respond in the event of an attack.
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Business email compromise (BEC) campaigns have become a serious business for fraudsters - and companies need to train their employees how to respond.

Just how large a threat are BECs? The FBI Internet Complaint Center (IC3) reported last summer that from October 2013 to May 2018, total losses worldwide for known BEC scams hit $12.5 billion.

Companies are starting to take note by including training on BECs in their security awareness programs. While BECs are typically social engineering crimes in which bad threat actors trick people either via phishing emails, phone or a combination of both to make wire transfers or hand over sensitive documents, there are some situations in which technology can help.

Here are some key insights into BECs and how to prepare for them – and how to respond if one of your users falls for one and you get attacked. 

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

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