Vulnerabilities / Threats

11/21/2017
10:30 AM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
Slideshows

6 Real Black Friday Phishing Lures

As the mega-shopping day approaches, here's a look at six examples of phishing attacks - and ways to avoid taking the bait.
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Ray-Ban 80% Discount Sale

The Hook: Ray-Ban Black Friday phishing campaign offered 80% off regular prices. 

Attackers' Technique: Used SEO poisoning to push their bogus Ray-Ban landing page link, www.rayban-outlet.us, to the top of Google searches when Ray-Ban and Black Friday were entered as keyword searches, says Deepen Desai, senior director of security research at Zscaler. Once users clicked the link, they were automatically redirected to www.rb6.us. In an effort to make the fraudulent page look more authentic, the attackers even placed two reviews on each item with a five-star rating, Desai says. Users were then asked to either create an account or sign-in to the bogus Ray-Ban site.

Cyberthieves' Purpose: Stole personally identifiable information (PII), such as first and last name, address, phone number, and email address, as well as credit card information and Facebook credentials, Desai says. Users also had the option of using their Facebook credentials to log into the bogus Ray-Ban site.

Avoiding the Bait: One telltale sign that a website may not be legit is to view its URL, Desai says. In the Ray-Ban case, the website claimed to be the official Ray-Ban site, but its URL was www.rb6.us, he notes. 'Users should go to the official Ray-Ban site and make their purchase there,' he says.

Image Source: Zscaler

Ray-Ban 80% Discount Sale

The Hook: Ray-Ban Black Friday phishing campaign offered 80% off regular prices.

Attackers' Technique: Used SEO poisoning to push their bogus Ray-Ban landing page link, www.rayban-outlet.us, to the top of Google searches when Ray-Ban and Black Friday were entered as keyword searches, says Deepen Desai, senior director of security research at Zscaler. Once users clicked the link, they were automatically redirected to www.rb6.us. In an effort to make the fraudulent page look more authentic, the attackers even placed two reviews on each item with a five-star rating, Desai says. Users were then asked to either create an account or sign-in to the bogus Ray-Ban site.

Cyberthieves' Purpose: Stole personally identifiable information (PII), such as first and last name, address, phone number, and email address, as well as credit card information and Facebook credentials, Desai says. Users also had the option of using their Facebook credentials to log into the bogus Ray-Ban site.

Avoiding the Bait: One telltale sign that a website may not be legit is to view its URL, Desai says. In the Ray-Ban case, the website claimed to be the official Ray-Ban site, but its URL was www.rb6.us, he notes. "Users should go to the official Ray-Ban site and make their purchase there," he says.

Image Source: Zscaler

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Riffguitare,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/22/2017 | 3:33:48 AM
Good
Thx for this really good article !
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