Vulnerabilities / Threats

6/24/2016
11:00 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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5 Ways To Think Like A Hacker

Security expert says CISOs need to use simulations more effectively so they can understand how hackers work and beat them at their own game.
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Image Source: www.itproportal.com

Image Source: www.itproportal.com

Everyone in the IT security world lives in fear that they may be vulnerable to the next high-profile breach. The list goes on: Target, Home Depot, Sony, and J.P. Morgan in the business sector and OPM and the FDIC in the federal government. There are dozens of other incidents.

Something has to change, and it will ever so slowly.

Guy Bejerano, CEO of SafeBreach, has been going around the world talking about continuous security validation. Rather than reacting to events as they unfold, Bejarano says organizations need to change their mindsets and think of continuously challenging their security defenses and security operations center teams via breach simulations. 

Besieged as they are by attacks from nation-states and cybercriminals, Bejarano says companies need to focus on the latest zero-day threats, as well as understand what the hacker wants to steal, map it to a cyber kill chain and break the steps in that kill chain.

“Getting into the network is one thing. Actually exfiltrating the data is another and where the damage really takes place,” he says. “By running breach simulations, we can find out how the hacker works and look for the most effective way to stop him from stealing important assets, be it credit card data, Social Security numbers or source code.” 

Here are five steps a CISO should take to reduce the advantages that hackers have today: 

 

 

Black Hat’s CISO Summit Aug 2 offers executive-level insights into technologies and issues security execs need to keep pace with the speed of business. Click to register.

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

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