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Threat Intelligence

12/3/2016
09:00 AM
Sean Martin
Sean Martin
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Where Cybercriminals Go To Buy Your Stolen Data

What malicious sites provide both free and paid access to stolen credit cards, company databases, malware and more?
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AlphaBay Market and Forum

AlphaBay, founded in 2014 by alpha02 (a well-known carder) and DeSnake, has become the most popular cybercrime market in 2016, since some competitive sites have shut down. This market emulates popular e-commerce sites like eBay or Amazon in appearance, navigation, and features, and accept digital currency like Bitcoin.

Yet, these customers arent shopping for best-selling books, vintage watches, groceries or diapers; rather they are browsing the selection of tens of thousands of items offered by AlphaBay for items related to drugs, malware, exploits, hacked accounts, stolen credentials, and other illicit goods and services including hacking services.

AlphaBay is better concealed and harder to access than some of the sites on this list; much of it cannot be found through a Google search. It is located on the unindexed, encrypted segment of Internet, the "Dark Web," and therefore must be accessed via the Tor network, which anonymizes all the traffic going to and from the site.

That isn't so difficult to do, though.

Thanks to Tor proxies, AlphaBay can be easily accessed through your normal web browser, says Christopher Doman, consulting analyst at Vectra Networks. The Tor Browser with a pre-configured browser can be run off of a USB flash drive, for example.

Because the information [on AlphaBay] is personally identifiable," says Doman, "it can be used in many ways, which include using the information as leads to enable other scams and activities.

These "leads" may be used, for example, by:
  • Craigslist sellers to give themselves high ratings for past service
  • Betting agencies to manipulate audience voting in Dancing With the Stars
  • Lobbyists to support their own causes by posting fake citizen feedback

Since AlphaBay can be easily accessed by criminals with tools such as the Tor browser, it also means that legitimate companies and researchers can also use the Tor browser to see what is for sale, says Adam Meyer, chief security officer at SurfWatch Labs. Companies should be monitoring the listings for any threats that may impact their organization or those in their supply chain.

Image Source: Carefree Solutions, SurfWatch Labs, Vectra Networks

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sasa23
50%
50%
sasa23,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/10/2017 | 9:46:04 PM
Re: Offensive Security by the Private Citizen
its so interesting, thanks
amirshk
100%
0%
amirshk,
User Rank: Author
12/16/2016 | 10:44:39 AM
Very interesting
Very interesting review of the marketplace
rayray2016
50%
50%
rayray2016,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/13/2016 | 12:55:28 PM
Twenty Motion
Awesome articles
lorraine89
50%
50%
lorraine89,
User Rank: Ninja
12/7/2016 | 8:05:06 AM
Identity theft
Well this just goes on to show how much of our data be it stored in our systems or browsing online is vulnerable and susceptible to being hacked or mistreated by malicious hands. Therefore it is always important to secure online footprints and privacy and what best way to do that than deploying secure vpn server like PureVPN which provides online encrypted connections. They have some deals going from what I read on my last visit to their website

www.purevpn.com/order
.osiris
50%
50%
.osiris,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/6/2016 | 1:27:29 AM
Re: .osiris
You can also add Armada board. A feaw years ago Crutop forum was very popular amonth the underground webmasters, until theor owner RedEye got prisoned.
RetiredUser
50%
50%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
12/4/2016 | 11:30:34 PM
Offensive Security by the Private Citizen
I'm curious after reading this about whether a private citizen can do anything at all to investigate potential stolen data and illegal activities associated with their finances or business.  In the past I'd had the opportunity to build a honeypot which I was excited about since I always wanted to test out some ideas, build a custom Tor, etc.  But then I got lots of feedback from techs that know about these things to not even touch the project.  Once you attach yourself to something that can be used for illegal activities you risk being implicated, especially due to (as noted in the article) the possibility of law enforcement monitoring various networks, websites and file access points.  I'm surprised, in fact, this article doesn't unequivocally state private citizens not associated with law enforcement should not even consider researching these places.  What's the real rule of thumb in this case?
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