Threat Intelligence

12/3/2016
09:00 AM
Sean Martin
Sean Martin
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Where Cybercriminals Go To Buy Your Stolen Data

What malicious sites provide both free and paid access to stolen credit cards, company databases, malware and more?
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Image Source: imsmartin

Image Source: imsmartin

With nothing more than a standard Web browser, cybercriminals can find personal, private information all over the public Internet. It isn't just legitimate services - from genealogy sites to public records and social media - that can be mined and exploited for nefarious purposes. Openly malicious criminal activities are also happening on the public Internet. 

True, much of the cybercrime underground consists of private and established communities that don't appear in a normal search engine and are not accessible by regular users without special authorization.

However, according to the team at identity protection and fraud detection provider CSID, there are different levels of cybercriminal resources - and not all are so tightly protected. The quality and quantity of the more easily accessible forums are still high, say the CSID team, and anyone can access content such as stolen credit cards, cyberattack tools, and even advanced malware, which can be leveraged with minimal technical know-how required.

Adam Tyler, chief innovation officer at CSID, describes how black-market organizations are becoming more like traditional online businesses we visit and buy from every day. “For example," he says, "many sites now have their own Facebook, Twitter and even YouTube pages to advise their member base on new attacks and tools that are available.”

Data sold on criminal marketplaces “age quickly, meaning that once the information is stolen, it has to be used for fraudulent purposes quickly,” says Christopher Doman, consulting analyst at Vectra Networks. “The more times the information is abused for fraud, the more the information will be devalued.”

“Companies should have these marketplaces monitored, looking for trends in data breaches and attacks as well as to see if any of their data has been compromised,” says Carefree Solutions’s CEO Paul San Soucie. “One point that I’m not sure is evident is that there is more public and Dark Web research than any one IT person can handle. Researching and absorbing this information requires significant training and experience. Even large US banks that have dedicated security staff are not able to do some of the research and analysis that specialized reconnaissance teams can perform.”

San Soucie nevertheless suggests treading carefully when doing this research. "While you can get to most of these sites using standard https, I still consider them dark and strongly recommend accessing them via a VPN as both criminal and government sources track access in some cases.”

Read on for a collection of some of the popular sites where private data, credentials, and attack tools are up for sale, or even for free download.

 

Sean Martin is an information security veteran of nearly 25 years and a four-term CISSP with articles published globally covering security management, cloud computing, enterprise mobility, governance, risk, and compliance—with a focus on specialized industries such as ... View Full Bio

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sasa23
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sasa23,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/10/2017 | 9:46:04 PM
Re: Offensive Security by the Private Citizen
its so interesting, thanks
amirshk
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amirshk,
User Rank: Author
12/16/2016 | 10:44:39 AM
Very interesting
Very interesting review of the marketplace
rayray2016
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rayray2016,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/13/2016 | 12:55:28 PM
Twenty Motion
Awesome articles
lorraine89
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lorraine89,
User Rank: Ninja
12/7/2016 | 8:05:06 AM
Identity theft
Well this just goes on to show how much of our data be it stored in our systems or browsing online is vulnerable and susceptible to being hacked or mistreated by malicious hands. Therefore it is always important to secure online footprints and privacy and what best way to do that than deploying secure vpn server like PureVPN which provides online encrypted connections. They have some deals going from what I read on my last visit to their website

www.purevpn.com/order
.osiris
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.osiris,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/6/2016 | 1:27:29 AM
Re: .osiris
You can also add Armada board. A feaw years ago Crutop forum was very popular amonth the underground webmasters, until theor owner RedEye got prisoned.
Christian Bryant
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Christian Bryant,
User Rank: Ninja
12/4/2016 | 11:30:34 PM
Offensive Security by the Private Citizen
I'm curious after reading this about whether a private citizen can do anything at all to investigate potential stolen data and illegal activities associated with their finances or business.  In the past I'd had the opportunity to build a honeypot which I was excited about since I always wanted to test out some ideas, build a custom Tor, etc.  But then I got lots of feedback from techs that know about these things to not even touch the project.  Once you attach yourself to something that can be used for illegal activities you risk being implicated, especially due to (as noted in the article) the possibility of law enforcement monitoring various networks, websites and file access points.  I'm surprised, in fact, this article doesn't unequivocally state private citizens not associated with law enforcement should not even consider researching these places.  What's the real rule of thumb in this case?
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