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Threat Intelligence

5/25/2017
12:30 PM
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WannaCry Gives Consumers a First Look into Ransomware

Although ransomware has been around for two years, it took the fast-moving and expansive WannaCry to provide a majority of consumers their first glimpse, according to a study released today.

WannaCry's high-profile rapid spread to 150 countries in a matter of days provided 57% of consumers with their first look into how ransomware works, according to a survey Carbon Black released today.

The survey of 5,000 consumers in the US revealed that 52% would be willing to pay a ransom if their personal computer was hijacked in a ransomware attack. And while 59% of consumers surveyed say they would be willing to pay a ransom if it was less than $100, it turns out that 12% are willing to shell out $500 or more.

WannaCry's attackers demand payments of up to $600 to unlock users' encrypted data. But of the 300,000 computers infected, the ransomware campaign has only raised roughly $137,000 to date, according to Elliptico.co's tracking of Bitcoin payments. That amounts to a per computer payout of 45 cents a hit.

Consumers, it turns out, aren't so understanding if the organizations they do business with get hit with a ransomware attack. In fact, 72% of consumers surveyed are willing to dump their financial institution if it becomes a ransomware victim, while 70% are willing to leave their retailer, the study found. Loyalty to a healthcare provider also goes out the door in a ransomware attack, with 68% of surveyed consumers saying they would drop their provider post ransomware attack.

Read more about Carbon Black's survey here.

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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2017 | 2:03:18 PM
Loyalty
I am not surprised that a high percentage of consumers stated they would drop their financial institution if they were a victim of the ransomware attacks. What needs to be more widely publicized for these institutions are the measures that are being taken to prevent and resolve WannaCry. Prevention through closing exposures and utilizing threat toolsets. If these safeguards don't suffice, then the utilization of a good back-up program to ensure that data is not lost and the ransom goes unpaid. These logistics should restore faith for the consumer because even though the trheat is prevalent the risk is low for institutions that provide such services.
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