Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Threat Intelligence

11/7/2019
05:50 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

TA542 Brings Back Emotet with Late September Spike

Overall volumes of banking Trojans and RATs increased during the third quarter, when Emotet was suspiciously absent until mid-September.

Emotet re-emerged toward the end of September, ending a months-long hiatus that gave banking Trojans and remote access Trojans (RATs) room to increase in the third quarter.

As a result of Emotet's absence for the first 10 weeks of the third quarter, global combined malicious URL and attachment message volume decreased by nearly 40%, researchers explain in the "Proofpoint Q3 2019 Threat Report." Despite this decline, overall volumes of banking Trojans and RATs increased by 18% and 55%, respectively, compared with the second quarter. Banking Trojans made up 46% of all malware in the third quarter, followed by RATs at 15%.

Emotet's absence was notable because of its sheer size. Between mid-2017 and May 1, 2019, TA542 spread the Emotet botnet in hundreds of increasingly large campaigns that eventually spread through North and South America, Western Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, targeting organizations across industries with tens of millions of messages. Over time, Emotet evolved from banking Trojan to a modular botnet designed to spread different types of digital threats.

Emotet disappeared from the threat landscape at the end of May, shifting overall malware trends. To some extent, researchers say, banking Trojans and RATs in the third quarter were filling the gap Emotet left. Threat groups that Proofpoint tracked as TA556 and TA544 drove banking Trojan volumes with large Ursnif campaigns, which made up 20% of all banking Trojans. Other attackers distributed Trickbot (37%), and a group tracked as TA516 spread IcedID (26%).

More attackers regularly distributed RATs in Emotet's absence – namely, a group tracked as TA505. "We noticed TA505 is a group that moves the needle," says Chris Dawson, threat intelligence lead at Proofpoint. When they choose to distribute a threat, they do it in volumes. In the third quarter, it led the charge with FlawedAmmyy (45%) and FlawedGrace (30%).

Emotet's reappearance in September brought another shift: When it emerged for the last two weeks of the month, it made up 11% of all malicious payloads for the entire third quarter. "Their absence impacted overall volume significantly," says Dawson of Emotet's temporary exit from cybercrime. "Now they're back with a vengeance, doing what they do."

There remains some speculation in the intelligence community as to where Emotet went and what its operators were doing, he explains. When major actors take a short break, it's usually because they lost control of the botnet or need to do some retooling behind the scenes. But Emotet's hiatus was long – a little over three months – and it's unclear why its actors went dark.

When TA542 re-emerged with new Emotet campaigns on September 16, researchers noticed a few subtle shifts in how it operated. The group generally followed the same model researchers had historically observed: geographically targeted emails with local-language lures and brands. Messages often had financial themes and contained malicious attachments or links to malicious documents that, when targets enabled macros, installed Emotet onto their machines.

But in addition to its longstanding targets, which included the US, the UK, Canada, Germany, and Australia, TA542 expanded its target countries to include Italy, Spain, Japan, Hong Kong, and Singapore. It also used a "Snowden" lure in its email campaigns, going back to its older 2018 habit of using seasonal and topical email lures. Before it dropped off the map, Dawson says, it was using generic business-based lures in its attack messages.

"It says something more about how we see social engineering get better and better," he explains, noting how even high-volume actors are getting smarter about geofencing and localization of languages when they craft malicious messages.

Related Content:

Check out The Edge, Dark Reading's new section for features, threat data, and in-depth perspectives. Today's top story: "What a Security Products Blacklist Means for End Users and Integrators."

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
DevSecOps: The Answer to the Cloud Security Skills Gap
Lamont Orange, Chief Information Security Officer at Netskope,  11/15/2019
Attackers' Costs Increasing as Businesses Focus on Security
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  11/15/2019
Human Nature vs. AI: A False Dichotomy?
John McClurg, Sr. VP & CISO, BlackBerry,  11/18/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: -when I told you that our cyber-defense was from another age
Current Issue
Navigating the Deluge of Security Data
In this Tech Digest, Dark Reading shares the experiences of some top security practitioners as they navigate volumes of security data. We examine some examples of how enterprises can cull this data to find the clues they need.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-16200
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
GNU Serveez through 0.2.2 has an Information Leak. An attacker may send an HTTP POST request to the /cgi-bin/reader URI. The attacker must include a Content-length header with a large positive value that, when represented in 32 bit binary, evaluates to a negative number. The problem exists in the ht...
CVE-2019-15073
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
An Open Redirect vulnerability for all browsers in MAIL2000 through version 6.0 and 7.0, which will redirect to a malicious site without authentication. This vulnerability affects many mail system of governments, organizations, companies and universities.
CVE-2019-15072
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
The login feature in "/cgi-bin/portal" in MAIL2000 through version 6.0 and 7.0 has a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability, allowing execution of arbitrary code via any parameter. This vulnerability affects many mail system of governments, organizations, companies and universities.
CVE-2019-15071
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
The "/cgi-bin/go" page in MAIL2000 through version 6.0 and 7.0 has a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability, allowing execution of arbitrary code via ACTION parameter without authentication. The code can executed for any user accessing the page. This vulnerability affects many mail syste...
CVE-2019-6176
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-20
A potential vulnerability reported in ThinkPad USB-C Dock Firmware version 3.7.2 may allow a denial of service.