Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Threat Intelligence

2/16/2018
11:40 AM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

Siemens Leads Launch of Global Cybersecurity Initiative

The new 'Charter of Trust' aims to make security a key element of the digital economy, critical infrastructure.

ICS/SCADA giant Siemens, along with IBM, Airbus, Allianz, Daimler, NXP, SGS, T-Mobile, and the Munich Security Conference, today outlined a new global effort aimed at making cybersecurity a default major component and philosophy for businesses and governments in order to protect critical infrastructure, businesses, and individuals worldwide.

The so-called Charter of Trust centers around the basic goals of protecting the data of individuals and businesses; preventing harm to critical infrastructure, businesses, and individuals via cyberattacks; and establishing a reliable and trusted network infrastructure, according to Joe Kaeser, CEO of Siemens AG.

"Failure to protect the systems that control our homes, hospitals, factories, grids, and virtually all of our infrastructure could have devastating consequences. Democratic and economic values need to be protected from cyber and hybrid threats," the Charter reads. "Cybersecurity is and has to be more than a seatbelt or an airbag here; it’s a factor that’s crucial to the success of the digital economy. People and organizations need to trust that their digital technologies are safe and secure; otherwise they won’t embrace the digital transformation. Digitalization and cybersecurity must evolve hand in hand."

The Charter calls for private industry and governments to work together to take action on those fronts, and includes 10 principles: taking ownership of cybersecurity and IT security; securing the digital supply chain; ensuring security as a default function of products and services; ensuring user-centric design; encouraging innovation of new security measures; educating organizations and the public in cybersecurity; providing certification for critical infrastructure and related products; encouraging transparency in incidents and incident response; establishing a regulatory framework; and facilitating joint initiatives to roll out the other nine principles.

Leo Simonovich, Siemens' vice president and global head of industrial cyber and digital security, says the charter is not merely a call to action. It's "a platform to have a discussion around fundamental principles. We need a common set of rules to create trust," Simonovich told journalists during a signing ceremony for the charter prior to its public unveiling. "It's the industry and government coming together around a common blueprint."

With the supply chain, for example, the goal is to ensure identity and access management, encryption, and continuous software patching becomes the norm. "This is essential to enabling trust to those things," Simonovich said. Product lifecycles also must include security at the core, he said.

He says the hope is that the charter will yield global policy, security standards, and international cooperation among law enforcement, for example. The members envision the European Union, the World Trade Organization, and the International Organization for Standardization, all playing a part.

"I also think it's about coming together around a set of blueprints: what does a secure power plant look like? What does a secure substation look like, for example," he said. "Coming up with discrete solutions around encryption, identity and access management, and security hygiene, and finding a ecosystem of technical partners and customers to co-create with us."

Nicholas Hodac, government and regulatory affairs executive at IBM Europe, says governments around the globe already are looking at how to improve cybersecurity, so the Charter is well-timed to help with that. "Thanks to the global operations of the Charter partners we will be able to promote coherence among government policies. In addition, we can use channels such as the OECD, G7, G20 and WTO to promote dialogue and convergence of cybersecurity policies," he says.

So how will the Charter roll out? "Our objective is to promote this initiative through various channels to more companies, large and small, for them to sign up," Hodac says. "We are currently in the process of identifying those channels and have already been approached by several companies who wish to join the initiative. In parallel we will be presenting this to various governments to demonstrate that industry is taking cybersecurity seriously, acting in a proactive way to address the threats - without the need for additional regulation - and also as a way to help shape cybersecurity policies."

Related Content:

 

Black Hat Asia returns to Singapore with hands-on technical Trainings, cutting-edge Briefings, Arsenal open-source tool demonstrations, top-tier solutions and service providers in the Business Hall. Click for information on the conference and to register.

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Commentary
Cyberattacks Are Tailored to Employees ... Why Isn't Security Training?
Tim Sadler, CEO and co-founder of Tessian,  6/17/2021
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
7 Powerful Cybersecurity Skills the Energy Sector Needs Most
Pam Baker, Contributing Writer,  6/22/2021
News
Microsoft Disrupts Large-Scale BEC Campaign Across Web Services
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  6/15/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-2322
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-23
Vulnerability in OpenGrok (component: Web App). Versions that are affected are 1.6.7 and prior. Easily exploitable vulnerability allows low privileged attacker with network access via HTTPS to compromise OpenGrok. Successful attacks of this vulnerability can result in takeover of OpenGrok. CVSS 3.1 ...
CVE-2021-20019
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-23
A vulnerability in SonicOS where the HTTP server response leaks partial memory by sending a crafted HTTP request, this can potentially lead to an internal sensitive data disclosure vulnerability.
CVE-2021-21809
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-23
A command execution vulnerability exists in the default legacy spellchecker plugin in Moodle 3.10. A specially crafted series of HTTP requests can lead to command execution. An attacker must have administrator privileges to exploit this vulnerabilities.
CVE-2021-34067
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-23
Heap based buffer overflow in tsMuxer 2.6.16 allows attackers to cause a Denial of Service (DoS) by running the application with a crafted file.
CVE-2021-34068
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-23
Heap based buffer overflow in tsMuxer 2.6.16 allows attackers to cause a Denial of Service (DoS) by running the application with a crafted file.