Threat Intelligence

6/15/2017
02:15 PM
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Most Organizations Not Satisfied with Threat Intelligence

Information Security Forum survey finds just one quarter of companies surveyed say threat intelligence technology is delivering on its promise.

With an eye toward gaining intel about attacks from adversaries, the vast majority of companies have threat intelligence in place but only a quarter are achieving the desired business goal, according to a report released today by the Information Security Forum (ISF).

As a result, the ISF offers up nine steps to help companies achieve their goals and sidestep five of the most common problems in hitting the mark. The ISF Threat Intelligence: React and Prepare report notes that 82% of its members surveyed have threat intelligence capabilities, but only 25% are satisfied with the results.

One problem includes a lack of a single definition of threat intelligence, another is finding people with skills to identify the threats and analyze the impact to business. Another issue: integrating threat intelligence into the way a company makes decisions, the report found.

In identifying the steps needed to help companies manage their threat intelligence capabilities, ISF offers up these nine recommendations: develop a prioritized list of threat intelligence requirements; select sources to support threat intelligence analysis; process information from sources; analyze the information; share the intel with the user; make a decision; take action; and circle back with a review and revise strategy, the report advises.

Read more about the ISF report here.

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