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Threat Intelligence

1/5/2017
02:30 PM
Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney
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7 Ways To Fine-Tune Your Threat Intelligence Model

The nature of security threats is too dynamic for set-and-forget. Here are some ways to shake off that complacency.
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Threat Intel's Brass Tacks

Ask your threat intel service providers anything... and everything. 
'Everyone should tell you how they gather and collate data,' says Dave Dufour, senior director of security architecture for Webroot Inc. 'Do they have a historical record, how do they [compile] it, do they pull the curtain back? These are all things you should ask, he adds. A blacklist of malicious IP address updated once a day may be enough for most organizations; if it's not, ask for more. 


Watch out for biases and marketing ploys masquerading as data, warns John Pironti, president of consultancy IP Architects. 'Sometimes you'll see a bias towards cause or hypothesis,' Pironti adds, as vendors and researchers try to support a specific point-of-view or 'pre-determined destiny.' That's an opening to ask more questions and press vendors to justify the data and conclusion.

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons, courtesy of Phase 4 Films

Threat Intel's Brass Tacks

Ask your threat intel service providers anything and everything.
"Everyone should tell you how they gather and collate data," says Dave Dufour, senior director of security architecture for Webroot Inc. "Do they have a historical record, how do they [compile] it, do they pull the curtain back? These are all things you should ask, he adds. A blacklist of malicious IP address updated once a day may be enough for most organizations; if it's not, ask for more.

Watch out for biases and marketing ploys masquerading as data, warns John Pironti, president of consultancy IP Architects. "Sometimes you'll see a bias towards cause or hypothesis," Pironti adds, as vendors and researchers try to support a specific point-of-view or "pre-determined destiny." That's an opening to ask more questions and press vendors to justify the data and conclusion.

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons, courtesy of Phase 4 Films

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cemal.dikmen
50%
50%
cemal.dikmen,
User Rank: Author
1/15/2017 | 8:11:20 AM
Question
lack of suitable technologies (525%). Did you mean 52%???
RetiredUser
50%
50%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
1/5/2017 | 11:04:41 PM
Re: $5.8 billion
Michael, I think that makes sense if you look at the breakdown.  Keep in mind that this is a wide-ranging examination and as we in the tech world know, costs are in every nook and cranny.

The scope of the report looks at the whole threat intelligence security market and covers all the solutions below:
  • Security Information And Event Management (SIEM)
  • Log Management
  • Identity and Access Management (IAM)
  • Security and Vulnerability Management (SVM)
  • Risk Management
  • Incident Forensics

That's already quite a bit of annual $$ right there per solution.  Then the service breakdown below is also considered. 
  • Managed Services
    • Advance Threat Monitoring
    • Security Intelligence Feeds
  • Professional Services
    • Consulting Services
    • Training and Support

Considering the projection covers SMBs and Large Enterprises, all the major verticals and the North America, European, Asia-Pacific, Middle East & Africa, and Latin America markets, I actually wonder if the $$ assessment won't be found wanting by that time.

I understand your intitial doubt, but I work for a company that just spent about $25M on technology over the last couple years, not including budget for Security to secure that tech.  That's one major company in one major vertical in Tech.

I think the numbers are starting to look pretty solid with the scope in mind, and knowing the threat activity that is out there now and what we've seen in the past. 
michaelfillin
50%
50%
michaelfillin,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/5/2017 | 4:37:49 PM
$5.8 billion
$5.8 billion, really ? Can't trust that
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