Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Threat Intelligence

9/17/2019
12:05 PM
50%
50%

15K Private Webcams Could Let Attackers View Homes, Businesses

Webcams could be potentially accessed and manipulated by anyone with an Internet connection, researchers say.

More than 15,000 webcams, many of which are located inside people's homes, are potentially accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. Researchers at Wizcase who discovered the cameras say many are vulnerable to attackers who could steal data or adjust the settings.

"These devices seem to be prone to being accessed remotely if no additional security measures are taken after installation," said Wizcase Web security expert Chase Williams in a blog post. "Quite a few" have easily predictable and default credentials to achieve admin access, he said.

Several types of popular webcams are affected: AXIS net cameras, Cisco Linksys webcam, IP Camera Logo Server, IP WebCam, IQ Invision Web camera, Mega-Pixel IP Camera, Mobotix, WebCamXP 5, and Yawcam. Thousands of these devices are exposed around the world, Williams wrote, and they compromise data belonging to individuals, families, and businesses.

Researchers at Wizcase, which tests and evaluates cybersecurity tools and products, were able to access cameras inside the kitchens, living rooms, and offices of private family homes, where they could see people talking on the phone and kids peering into the camera lens. Some of the webcams they analyzed provided a direct look into storage units, churches, mosques, tennis courts, museum security feeds, hotels, parking lots, and more.

While they couldn't determine a device's owner based on technical information alone, researchers could use context from videos and administrative access to unearth user data and estimate the webcam's geolocation. In rare cases, they could figure out its owner. In exploring implications for these devices, Williams pointed to the potential for settings and credentials to be changed, government agencies to monitor users, stores to peek into competitor businesses, or personally identifiable information to be used in identity theft.

"As people continue to connect their household devices to the Internet, you can expect to see more of this sort of privacy breach, particularly as organizations lacking the skills or experience to build such products leap onto the IoT bandwagon," says Stephen Gailey, head of solutions architecture at Exabeam.

Read more details here.

Check out The Edge, Dark Reading's new section for features, threat data, and in-depth perspectives. Today's top story: "How a PIA Can CYA."

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
7 Tips for Choosing Security Metrics That Matter
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer,  10/19/2020
IoT Vulnerability Disclosure Platform Launched
Dark Reading Staff 10/19/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-27673
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-22
An issue was discovered in the Linux kernel through 5.9.1, as used with Xen through 4.14.x. Guest OS users can cause a denial of service (host OS hang) via a high rate of events to dom0, aka CID-e99502f76271.
CVE-2020-27674
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-22
An issue was discovered in Xen through 4.14.x allowing x86 PV guest OS users to gain guest OS privileges by modifying kernel memory contents, because invalidation of TLB entries is mishandled during use of an INVLPG-like attack technique.
CVE-2020-27675
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-22
An issue was discovered in the Linux kernel through 5.9.1, as used with Xen through 4.14.x. drivers/xen/events/events_base.c allows event-channel removal during the event-handling loop (a race condition). This can cause a use-after-free or NULL pointer dereference, as demonstrated by a dom0 crash vi...
CVE-2020-3996
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-22
Velero (prior to 1.4.3 and 1.5.2) in some instances doesn’t properly manage volume identifiers which may result in information leakage to unauthorized users.
CVE-2020-15680
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-22
If a valid external protocol handler was referenced in an image tag, the resulting broken image size could be distinguished from a broken image size of a non-existent protocol handler. This allowed an attacker to successfully probe whether an external protocol handler was registered. This vulnerabil...