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The Failures of Internet Governance

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Government snooping and cybercrime exacerbate the basic problem of having a world without borders living inside a world with many borders.

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vikramsoori
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vikramsoori,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/23/2015 | 8:14:04 AM
Re: Biggest fears about Internet governance trends?
nice post thank you
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2014 | 4:21:07 AM
Human Rights vs Nice to Haves
Infrastructure of any kind can be changed at any time once it has become solely regulated by a Government, unless you live in an overly successful democracy.  This fight right now is a proposal, however, and not a fight for our "freedom" or "right" to the Internet.  Just as Americans had to fight "to be free" when we came here to North America, we will have to fight "to have a free Internet".  Dmitri Alperovitch is right in that we can't assume we're going to have the same Internet in the near future that we've grown accostomed to.  Some countries - UN members and otherwise - are using Edward Snowden as an indicator it is time to take control of the Internet, even create their own Internet that silos off other countries, particularly the United States, and they have every right to do that, just as we do.  Because, unfortunately, the Internet being freely available isn't directly a human rights issue.  Freedom of speech and accessibility to forums that allow us to be heard globally are human rights issues, I believe, but how we get that done is another story.  So, we need to be realistic here.  If we truly want open, inclusive and participatory Internet governance, we need to strengthen our bargaining powers and negotiation skills, and be ready to fight.
StephenJ4
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StephenJ4,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/15/2014 | 11:52:25 PM
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
The Internet inherited the theoretical "trust" of the forerunner Arpanet. Originally connections were for US military use in case of nuclear war then Universities and other Institutions involved in military research were added. In part because access to the network was through authorized computer centers and also "the Academic environment is Honest"; every node became a trusted node. (Considering the amount of faked research (c.f. Dr Teller) and Academic backstabbing, the honesty/trust thing was over rated. Still present in the IETF RFC system.). Internet grew up with IP which grew up with Unix (NCP original Unix/Internet protocol ~1971), and Unix (SunOS/BSD) influence is seen in BGP. We would probably not have such a security mess if the Morris Worm was taken for the alarm it was meant to be. I appreciate the built-in security in IPv6, however it remains that IPv6 is a primary attack tool commonly used by malware. Changes in Internet governance including core protocols like BGP might help. But thinking of the Republican bill in US Congress to requiring US control of the Internet bring up the age old "Who'll watch the watchers" saying.  Currently any State with control of a TLD can knock out the Internet.

Politics of course triumphs security.
Kwattman
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Kwattman,
User Rank: Black Belt
5/1/2014 | 11:29:42 AM
Re: Biggest fears about Internet governance trends?
Great points raised and I agree - the views are divergent, but underneath both seems to be an agreement that these are dangerous waters. Open communication solves more than restricted controls but then governments usually want to control the information and propaganda their people see. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
4/28/2014 | 2:08:05 PM
Biggest fears about Internet governance trends?
Sara, thanks for raising these issues about control v freedom of the Internet and how (and who) will be making important decisions that impact all of us about privacy and security. Your interviewees offered some divergent views. Do others others in the Dark Reading community agree or disagree?

 

 

 

 
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