Risk

12/9/2015
01:50 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

The Employee Password Habits That Could Hurt Enterprises

While education and efforts around online credentials are improving, password hygiene still has problems
Previous
1 of 10
Next

The lines drawn between personal digital space and work digital space are all but disintegrated as the traditional 40-hour work week in a confined office dissolves away in this gig economy. This makes life difficult when it comes to accessing and securing data. A survey out recently by Ping Identity shows how even though companies my have good credential policies in place, and employees are made aware of security, their password safety still lags. Here's a look at some of the relevant stats. 

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 10
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2015 | 4:52:52 PM
Recipe for disaster
The password-changing policy is possibly the worst.  It makes no account for employees who actually have strong passwords and also fails to take into account actual risk.  That's how you get simple-to-guess/hack passwords.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2015 | 4:51:34 PM
Re: Nice compliation of bad habits and statistics
Not to mention family members and friends who may become aware of their loved ones' passwords in other ways.

I once went on a date with someone who told me that because of her company's onerous password-changing requirements, she always just did a minor variation of the same (easy-to-guess) word.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2015 | 4:49:50 PM
Re: We're all guilty
This is exactly why many security experts today advise what was once taboo advice -- that people write down their passwords, specifically to allow for greater complexity and entropy.  Better you write down your password and keep it in a secure place (for instance, not on a sticky note on your computer monitor) and it be super hard to remember than have an easy to remember (and easy to guess/hack) password that you don't write down.
RyonKnight
100%
0%
RyonKnight,
User Rank: Strategist
12/16/2015 | 3:29:56 AM
All on one page please
Article on one page please.  I'd like to read it but I'm not clicking through 10 pages.
BarbaraJohnson
50%
50%
BarbaraJohnson,
User Rank: Author
12/12/2015 | 7:22:21 PM
Nice compliation of bad habits and statistics
I especially like "*54% of employees share login information with family members so they can access their computers, smartphones and tablets" It's a good specific point to add into user awareness material.
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
12/10/2015 | 7:34:49 AM
We're all guilty
I bet we're all guilty of something on this list, even those who are pretty good with password security. They're endlessly annoying though. You have to remember them, yet make them complicated and change them regularly. It's such a headache. 

The amount of services we all use now too, there's no way to remember everything. But then do you change your password storage login often? If you forget that, the pain-in-the-neck of having to reset everything is ridiculous.
13 Russians Indicted for Massive Operation to Sway US Election
Kelly Sheridan, Associate Editor, Dark Reading,  2/16/2018
Facebook Aims to Make Security More Social
Kelly Sheridan, Associate Editor, Dark Reading,  2/20/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
How to Cope with the IT Security Skills Shortage
Most enterprises don't have all the in-house skills they need to meet the rising threat from online attackers. Here are some tips on ways to beat the shortage.
Flash Poll
[Strategic Security Report] Navigating the Threat Intelligence Maze
[Strategic Security Report] Navigating the Threat Intelligence Maze
Most enterprises are using threat intel services, but many are still figuring out how to use the data they're collecting. In this Dark Reading survey we give you a look at what they're doing today - and where they hope to go.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.