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Perimeter

3/17/2015
04:00 PM
Sara Peters
Sara Peters
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The 7 Best Social Engineering Attacks Ever

Seven reminders of why technology alone isn't enough to keep you secure.
7 of 9

Michigan Fleeced By Nigerian Prince Scam

Nigerian frogs like this one don't generally turn into princes when you kiss them, and Nigerian princes who send you emails asking for money don't generally turn out to be princes at all. But that doesn't stop people from falling for the scheme.

What we think of as "Nigerian Prince" scams aren't anything new. They go back to at least the 16th century, with the character instead being a Spanish prisoner who's actually innocent (and wealthy).

One of the most embarrassing examples in recent times occurred in 2007. Thomas Katona, the treasurer of Alcona County, Michigan embezzled roughly $1.25 million of the county's $4 million operating budget and paid at least some of it to a scammer. The county had little hope of recovering any of the stolen money.

Katona was sentenced to nine to 14 years in prison for eight counts of embezzlement, one count of attempted embezzlement, and two counts of forgery. As the state Attorney General said, "The defendant's actions are unthinkable and indefensible."

Nigerian prince and "419" scams are definitely not a thing of the past. In 2013, according to recent research, such scams cost victims $12.7 billion worldwide; $82 million in the US alone. As the researchers explain, some of the worst victims of advance fee fraud scams experience something like an addiction, and some experience something akin to the Stockholm syndrome that kidnap victims suffer, defending their scammers, even though they only know them through e-mail communications.

(Image: "natal ghost frog," by dotun55, via Flickr.)

7 of 9
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CASVPN
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CASVPN,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2019 | 7:36:16 AM
What is Social Engineering really?
I have been reading about the social engineering thing lately, I am getting lots of phishing emails lately and I wonder where I went wrong. May be someone has got a hold of my email. I have become more aware now and I literally check every link before even opening it.
Megan is Always Wright
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50%
Megan is Always Wright,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/9/2017 | 11:15:58 AM
Re: What is Social Engineering really?
Social engineering is basically a technique that has long been used by humans even before the birth of the Internet. By using these techniques, the evildoers among us are able to win our trust, or more like fool us into sharing stuff that we shouldn't.

I also didnt understand what it was until i read this article (https://www.purevpn.com/blog/social-engineering-attacks/) which explained what it was and how to protect against it
nickhudson
50%
50%
nickhudson,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2017 | 8:03:33 AM
What is Social Engineering really?
I have been reading about the social engineering thing lately, I am getting lots of phishing emails lately and I wonder where I went wrong. May be someone has got a hold of my email. I have become more aware now and I literally check every link before even opening it.
baller188
100%
0%
baller188,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2017 | 6:00:19 AM
Forex security and vulnerabilities
Great post as always. Technology advances every day, new vulnerabilities arise all the time. Security is everyones main priority and rightly so. For any site owner nowadays you need a dedicated security team to make sure you and your customers are safe. Its a scary world out there.
Sincee
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50%
Sincee,
User Rank: Strategist
10/2/2015 | 4:56:47 AM
thank's for post
system security in any country is the future !
MichaelH91401
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50%
MichaelH91401,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2015 | 3:18:11 PM
Re: name required
The post refers to "Ferrara" repeatedly, but never describes who he is or what he does. 
AnonymousC493
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50%
AnonymousC493,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2015 | 9:41:21 AM
Social Engineering examples
Here's another example:

https://engineering.social/2015/05/02/sinkholing-script-kiddies/

It's not one of 'the best social engineering attacks' ever, but shows that anyone can be a target.

 

 
mithoon
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100%
mithoon,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/28/2015 | 2:37:41 AM
Re: name required
great post
delllphi
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50%
delllphi,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/24/2015 | 7:21:23 AM
Confidence Man
The name of the "confidence man" was "William Thompson" and not "Samuel Williams". The article "Arrest of the Confidence Man" (New-York Herald, July 8, 1849) can be found online.
xmarksthespot
50%
50%
xmarksthespot,
User Rank: Strategist
3/19/2015 | 4:24:22 AM
Good examples
Great article!  Periodic User awareness training to reduce social engineering is of paramount importance.  Some phishing emails are so good that high trained security people can fall for them.  The examples in the article effectively demonstrate the issue.


The rule I use for my own emails is not click links in emails, including unsubscribe, unless the email is expected, such as one as confirmation during new account setup. Of course, never click on attachments either unless they are expected.  I have within Spyshelter (anti-keylogger) where I can save an attachment, right click the file and on the pop-up menu click 'Spyshelter-> Check it on VirusTotal'; it uploads to virustotal.com .   It's then scanned by over 50 antivirus software products. 

I think this rule is probably the most important security measure I use for computers at my home.
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