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Attacks/Breaches

6/29/2018
09:35 AM
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The 6 Worst Insider Attacks of 2018 – So Far

Stalkers, fraudsters, saboteurs, and all nature of malicious insiders have put the hurt on some very high-profile employers.
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If recent statistics are any indication, enterprise security teams might be greatly underestimating the risk that insider threats pose to their organizations. One study, by Crowd Research Partners, shows just 3% of executives pegged the potential cost of an insider threat at more than $2 million. Yet, according to Ponemon Institute, the average cost of insider threats per year for an organization is more than $8 million.

And those are just the quantifiable risks. When insider attackers hit hardest — particularly malicious insiders who are looking to commit fraud or intentionally do bad — the ramifications can be much more widespread than the typical data breach.

We're just six months into the year, and already we've seen some particularly damaging malicious insider events illustrate this truth. Here are some of the highest-profile incidents, all of which can act as a warning to enterprises to get serious about their monitoring and controls around employee activity.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/3/2018 | 6:03:06 AM
Whistleblowing
Frankly, given the CEO's penchant for bombast, overstatement, and self-aggrandizement, I'm not entirely sure I personally find the Tesla employee's claims as untrustworthy here.

Moreover, employers tend to find whistleblowing to be just as much sabotage as actual wrench-throwing.

REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
7/13/2018 | 8:26:25 AM
Re: Whistleblowing
SUNTRUST had a horrible reputation in the IT field for firing a ton of workers to train Indian replacements and sign non-disclosures.  Theyhave zero respect for IT as it relates to corp and fully deserve what they bought. 
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
7/13/2018 | 9:58:34 AM
Yet Another Healthcare Breach - A Solution Soon?
Nuance is yet another healthcare breach that begs the question: When are Electronic Health Record (EHR) and medical application vendors going to wise up? In the EHR world (and even in the paper record world) de-identified patient data is an important step in the records workflow. Patient health information (PHI) from a medical record is stripped of all direct identifiers that can be used to identify the patient the record belongs to. Here's an idea inspired by that process that might actually work:

1. Any healthcare software vendor that houses patient data would be regulated to do the following:

a. Write into their PHI-housing software a feature that 1) encrypts PHI upon entry to the application, 2) ONLY decrypts the information for viewing and editing within the application based upon Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) that could include user credentials, network IP signatures and local system certificates, etc. and 3) any attempt to extract the encrypted data outside the application database would results in a useless blob of encrypted information.

2. Any healthcare software vendor who did not execute #1 would be fined and withheld from Federal money until they achieved that task; perhaps incentives could be offered to encourage them, too.

This model is possible and while it took a long time just to move to EHRs, having the EHR and all the other medical software applications saves no money at all if they keep getting breached. The model above would protect PHI even from insider attacks because in order for anyone to read the PHI they would have to have all the required elements, including the application server, app client, local certificates, user logins, IP signatures and so on for the data to decrypt for viewing. Potentially massive PHI data breaches could be a thing of the past with something like this in place.
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