Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Analytics

Study Suggests Differences Between Security Perceptions, Reality

Newer technologies considered more effective than traditional standbys; many don't know whether their organization has been breached

Sometimes, conventional wisdom isn't so wise.

That's a conclusion that might be drawn from a survey published yesterday by security consultancy Securosis and security tool vendor Imperva. The Web-based study of 1,100 professionals suggests there are some differences between perception and reality when it comes to security controls.

For example, Web application firewalls were ranked among the five top-rated technologies for reducing the number of data breach incidents. Others highly ranked technologies included network data loss prevention, full drive encryption, server/endpoint hardening, and endpoint data loss prevention.

Interestingly, these tools that were ranked most effective are not always considered "standard" issue when outfitting an enterprise network, as firewalls or antivirus tools might be.

"This data indicates that in order to mitigate current threats, you need a very different set of technology than you would have used two years ago, says Amichai Shulman, CTO and co-founder of Imperva.

Conversely, some tools that have a poor reputation for effectiveness may still be essential to enterprise defenses, Shulman observes. For example, email filtering, which ranked among the least effective tools by perception, was ranked among the most effective technologies in actually reducing the number of security incidents in the enterprise.

"There are many complaints about email filters, but in the end they are very effective," Shulman says.

The study also notes some disparities between the common perception that security breaches are on the rise and the reality of breach incidence.

"Nearly two-thirds of organizations either didn't know if they suffered any data breach incidents, or stated that they didn't experience any," the survey says. "Of those that did, 46 percent saw a decline in breaches, while 27 percent reported the same number of breaches from the previous year."

Among respondents who knew of data breaches in their own organizations, 62 percent said malicious intentions were behind them. Insider breaches comprised 33 percent of incidents, hackers comprised 29 percent, and the remaining breaches were accidental.

"The accidental breaches are still often overlooked," Shulman says. "Usually, when we talk about security we think of hackers and criminals. That's the perception, when in fact, negligence and incompetence often are major factors in data loss."

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Discuss" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message. Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
NSA Appoints Rob Joyce as Cyber Director
Dark Reading Staff 1/15/2021
Vulnerability Management Has a Data Problem
Tal Morgenstern, Co-Founder & Chief Product Officer, Vulcan Cyber,  1/14/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
2020: The Year in Security
Download this Tech Digest for a look at the biggest security stories that - so far - have shaped a very strange and stressful year.
Flash Poll
Assessing Cybersecurity Risk in Today's Enterprises
Assessing Cybersecurity Risk in Today's Enterprises
COVID-19 has created a new IT paradigm in the enterprise -- and a new level of cybersecurity risk. This report offers a look at how enterprises are assessing and managing cyber-risk under the new normal.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-27852
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-20
A stored Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the survey feature in Rocketgenius Gravity Forms before 2.4.21 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via a textarea field. This code is interpreted by users in a privileged role (Administrator, Editor, etc.).
CVE-2021-3137
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-20
XWiki 12.10.2 allows XSS via an SVG document to the upload feature of the comment section.
CVE-2020-27850
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-20
A stored Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability in forms import feature in Rocketgenius Gravity Forms before 2.4.21 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the import of a GF form. This code is interpreted by users in a privileged role (Administrator, Editor, etc.).
CVE-2020-27851
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-20
Multiple stored HTML injection vulnerabilities in the "poll" and "quiz" features in an additional paid add-on of Rocketgenius Gravity Forms before 2.4.21 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary HTML code via poll or quiz answers. This code is interpreted by users in a privile...
CVE-2020-13134
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-20
Tufin SecureChange prior to R19.3 HF3 and R20-1 HF1 are vulnerable to stored XSS. The successful exploitation requires admin privileges (for storing the XSS payload itself), and can exploit (be triggered by) admin users. All TOS versions with SecureChange deployments prior to R19.3 HF3 and R20-1 HF1...