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Yes, Virginia, There Will Be More Attacks

This is the time of year when the editor of a publication usually issues a warm and fuzzy holiday message that's supposed to make you want to gather around the fire with your family for a group hug.
This is the time of year when the editor of a publication usually issues a warm and fuzzy holiday message that's supposed to make you want to gather around the fire with your family for a group hug.

Unless, of course, your publication has to do with information security.When you spend your days dealing with DDOS attacks and SQL injections, there aren't many warm and fuzzy messages you can issue. "May all your patches be operational!" "May your vulnerabilities go unnoticed and unexploited in 2009!" Not exactly Hallmark card stuff.

If there's any good news for security pros in 2009, however, it's probably the general consensus that IT security will remain a top priority for corporations and government agencies. We've seen a lot of predictions since the economic downturn began, and a lot of reports and surveys on organizational plans. Not one of them suggests IT security will take huge cuts, or become less important, in the new year.

Of course, the main reason for that continued emphasis is a general rise in computer crime. Virtually every projection we've seen indicates that attacks will continue to rise in frequency and sophistication in the coming year. As the economy drops, the crime wave rises, both inside the company and out.

It's hardly a warm and fuzzy message, but if you're a security pro, it at least gives you a mild sense of job security. Yes, Virginia, attacks will continue in 2009. In fact, they'll likely get worse.

So, dear readers, it's time to gather around the firewall, pour a cup of Red Bull, and toast the new year. Because we know what's coming down our chimneys is a lot more likely to be naughty than nice.

Happy holidays!

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