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3/12/2014
02:21 PM
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Windows XP Security Issues: Fact Vs. Fiction

Are you prepared for the end of Microsoft support for Windows XP next month?

In less than a month, Microsoft will stop supporting Windows XP, still the second most widely used PC operating system in the world. The company announced the OS's April 8 termination date years ago, but with as many as 500 million XP systems still active last month, not everyone is going to make a move in time.

XP users have vocally protested Microsoft's abandonment of such a popular product. Objections include upgrade costs, application compatibility concerns, and whether customers should be effectively forced to leave a product that they are happy with. Despite Microsoft's increased efforts, which now include daily pop-up notifications on XP systems, almost one in three computers still ran the 12-year-old OS in February, according to web-tracking firm Net Applications. More alarming for Microsoft, Windows XP's market share hasn't decreased since last year and Windows 8.1's has barely grown. Both trends imply the company's escalating messaging has fallen largely on deaf ears.

So what will happen when April 8 passes and millions of people are still running Windows XP?

"We're into panic time," Michael Silver, a VP at the research firm Gartner, said in an interview. He said the amount of risk depends to some extent on what XP laggards can accomplish in a hurry.

Read the full article herehere.

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Add Your Comment" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message.

Michael Endler joined InformationWeek as an associate editor in 2012. He previously worked in talent representation in the entertainment industry, as a freelance copywriter and photojournalist, and as a teacher. Michael earned a BA in English from Stanford University in 2005 ... View Full Bio

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shjacks55
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shjacks55,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/15/2014 | 11:38:00 AM
re: Windows XP Security Issues: Fact Vs. Fiction
Oh, and XP will still continue to work after April 8th. No Patch Tuesday? No problem: notice that most windows updates are to fix vulnerabilities in previous updates, or push new M$ tech. The last three years, all of our malware tickets (100+ customers; 2000+ desktops) are Win7/8 and those OS are <25% (XP is 50%). Some customers still on Windows 2000 have been stable since no more M$ updates.
shjacks55
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50%
shjacks55,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/15/2014 | 11:28:44 AM
re: Windows XP Security Issues: Fact Vs. Fiction
Funny. April Fools! Newer POS Embedded is actually XP Embedded with lipstick on the pig; supported by Microsoft until 2019. 2019. 2019.
All these smart people can't understand why business doesn't downgrade to newer Windows NT 6.x variants. Clue: Windows 2000 (NT5.0) didn't sell well. Microsoft added Win95 and Win16 compatibility (a security risk) to XP. Stuff that worked in XP doesn't work in Vista/Win7/Win8 (NT 6.0/6.1/6.2), simple as that.

Microsoft gave business the finger by not addressing that need for continuity, saying "write new applications" & "buy new hardware". Microsoft must have thought business raising a finger towards them as business implying Microsoft was number one.
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