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4/7/2011
04:21 PM
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TrustWave Teams With Tucows, Launches QuickTrust SSL

Trustwave SSL offerings now available through Tucows’ OpenSRS

CHICAGO (April 6, 2011) – Trustwave, a leading global certificate authority and issuer of SSL certificates and online identities, has partnered with Tucows’ wholesale Internet division, OpenSRS, to deliver Trustwave SSL products and secure site seals to OpenSRS resellers and their customers.

OpenSRS manages over ten million domain names and millions of mailboxes for a network of over 11,000 web hosts, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and other resellers around the world. Trustwave’s leading SSL products including digital certificates, wildcard SSL certificates and extended validation SSL certificates will be available at OpenSRS.com.

“We’re excited to bring Trustwave security products to our resellers,” said Adam Eisner, director of OpenSRS product management. “Trustwave has an excellent security reputation within the industry and we expect that these new products will be very well received and quickly adopted by our channel.”

Tucows OpenSRS partner program will also be the first to offer Trustwave’s new SSL certificate product branded QuickTrust SSL. This new SSL certificate will provide partners and resellers a trustworthy and more secure SSL certificate offering by including malware detection and other security checks to enhance the safety for the site visitor. While providing additional security checks, QuickTrust SSL still provides a fast certificate issuance to customers looking for a value priced certificate.

“We are very excited about our partnership with OpenSRS,” said Brian Trzupek, Trustwave vice president of managed identity and SSL. “OpenSRS has an amazing presence in online services and now the OpenSRS resellers are armed with a highly differentiated offering in the trusted SSL products from a leading brand in online security.”

About Tucows

Tucows is a global Internet services company. OpenSRS manages over ten million domain names and millions of email boxes through a reseller network of over 11,000 web hosts and ISPs. Hover is the easiest way for individuals and small businesses to manage their domain names and email addresses. YummyNames owns premium domain names that generate revenue through advertising or resale. Butterscotch.com is an online video network building on the foundation of Tucows.com. More information can be found at http://tucowsinc.com.

About Trustwave

Trustwave is a leading provider of on-demand and subscription-based information security and payment card industry compliance management solutions to businesses and government entities throughout the world. For organizations faced with today's challenging data security and compliance environment, Trustwave provides a unique approach with comprehensive solutions that include its flagship TrustKeeper' compliance management software and other proprietary security solutions including EV SSL certificates and secure digital certificates. Trustwave has helped thousands of organizations–ranging from Fortune 500 businesses and large financial institutions to small and medium-sized retailers-manage compliance and secure their network infrastructure, data communications and critical information assets. Trustwave is headquartered in Chicago with offices throughout North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. For more information, visit https://www.trustwave.com.

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