Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

9/6/2018
01:00 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

The SOC Gets a Makeover

Today's security operations center is all about reducing the number of alerts with emerging technologies - and enhancing old-school human collaboration. Here's how some real-world SOCs are evolving.

(Continued from Page 1)

Some SOC operators are looking to cut head count as much as possible. One approach is to completely automate Tier 1 tasks, incorporating them into orchestration and automation platforms, for instance. "You cut the number of people," says one CISO from a large company who requested anonymity. Tier 2 analysts become more of the skilled first responder who can move and adapt, and Tier 3 can tackle more proactive threat hunting and IR.

"So you bring in more skilled people," the CISO says, who can be trained to perform more advanced tasks like penetration testing, and operate with a smaller team.

Tier Mashup
At managed security services provider MKACyber's SOC in Fairfax, Va., data and detection are organized by use cases and attack types that can help guide junior analysts through the SOC process. Mischel Kwon, founder and CEO of MKACyber, says the goal is to operate less as a tiered operation and more as a collaborative one. The analysts have "gates" that lead them step-by-step through the process and release them to the next step, for example, she says.

So when a phishing email generates an alert, for instance, the process flow guides them through a review to confirm whether or not the alert is actually an incident. "They then upload all of the artifacts, and a [senior] analyst reviews their work and approves it for the next level."

By integrating the approvals process and IR actions, analysts of all levels work together, she says.

Kwon predicts SOCs will be more cloud-based in the next five to 10 years. "I'm hoping there's a change for the future with more integration of vulnerability management and remediation in the SOC" as well, she says.

Data-handling in the SOC also will evolve. "In the next few years, I see us doing different types of handling data ... getting more into tagging and more data science-type research as opposed to the SIEM [approach]," Kwon says. "I see us moving away from the SIEM model."

Related Content:

 

Black Hat Europe returns to London Dec 3-6 2018  with hands-on technical Trainings, cutting-edge Briefings, Arsenal open-source tool demonstrations, top-tier security solutions and service providers in the Business Hall. Click for information on the conference and to register.

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Previous
2 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 7/13/2020
Omdia Research Launches Page on Dark Reading
Tim Wilson, Editor in Chief, Dark Reading 7/9/2020
Russian Cyber Gang 'Cosmic Lynx' Focuses on Email Fraud
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  7/7/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-20907
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-13
In Lib/tarfile.py in Python through 3.8.3, an attacker is able to craft a TAR archive leading to an infinite loop when opened by tarfile.open, because _proc_pax lacks header validation.
CVE-2020-14174
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-13
Affected versions of Atlassian Jira Server and Data Center allow remote attackers to view titles of a private project via an Insecure Direct Object References (IDOR) vulnerability in the Administration Permission Helper. The affected versions are before version 7.13.6, from version 8.0.0 before 8.5....
CVE-2019-20901
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-13
The login.jsp resource in Jira before version 8.5.2, and from version 8.6.0 before version 8.6.1 allows remote attackers to redirect users to a different website which they may use as part of performing a phishing attack via an open redirect in the os_destination parameter.
CVE-2019-20898
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-13
Affected versions of Atlassian Jira Server and Data Center allow remote attackers to access sensitive information without being authenticated in the Global permissions screen. The affected versions are before version 8.8.0.
CVE-2019-20899
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-13
The Gadget API in Atlassian Jira Server and Data Center in affected versions allows remote attackers to make Jira unresponsive via repeated requests to a certain endpoint in the Gadget API. The affected versions are before version 8.5.4, and from version 8.6.0 before 8.6.1.