Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

5/1/2019
03:35 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Study Exposes Breadth of Cyber Risk

New study shows SMBs face greater security exposure, but large companies still support vulnerable systems as well.

Organizations with high-value external hosts are three times more likely to have severe security exposure to vulnerabilities such as outdated Windows software on their off-premise systems versus their on-premise ones.

While external hosts at SMBs face greater exposure than larger companiesas company revenues grow so do the number of hosts and security issues affecting them, according to a new study published yesterday by the Cyentia Institute and researched by RiskRecon. The study analyzed data from 18,000 organizations and more than 5 million hosts located in more than 200 countries.

The study, Internet Risk Surface Report: Exposure in a Hyper-Connected World, identified more than 32 million security vulnerabilities, such as old Magecart ecommerce software and systems running outdated versions of OpenSSL that are vulnerable to exploits such as DROWN and Shellshock.

Wade Baker, founder of the Cyentia Institute, says the results have to be carefully analyzed. For example, 4.6% of companies with fewer than 10 employees had high or critical exposure to security vulnerabilities, versus 1.8% of companies with more than 100,000 employees. So while the 1.8% number sounds good percentage-wise, that's still many more hosts exposed.

"In many ways, the findings are not surprising," Baker explains. "When we broke it down by industry, banking had the lowest exposure at 0.6%. But let's say an organization has 10,000 hosts and gets its exposure number down to 1%, that’s still 100 external hosts exposed. All a hacker needs is one host to exploit to do damage. And while I think the 1.8% number for large organization is good, we still have a lot of work to do."

Kelly White, founder and CEO of RiskRecon, adds that while the 0.6% number for the banking industry is not perfect, it's approaching what's financially possible for many organizations. Even banks with deep pockets have to decide how much money they can spend on IT security and run an analysis of how much risk they can accept, he says.

"Companies have to focus on protection, monitoring, and recovery," White says. "The stronger you are at prevention, it takes the pressure off monitoring and recovery."

The research also found that North America, Western Europe, and Western Asia have the lowest exposure scores. The scores for those regions were 1.5%, 1.7%, and 1.8% respectively. The regions with the highest security exposure included Eastern Asia (5.5%), Pacific Island Nations (4.4%), and Eastern Europe (4.1%).

"While some of the developed regions are better at cybersecurity, many of those regions adopted the Internet much sooner and have had a longer time to put governance in place," Kelly says. "I think people may have to think twice and decide if they can trust suppliers in Eastern Asian and Eastern Europe with their data."

Related Content: 

 

 

 

 

Join Dark Reading LIVE for two cybersecurity summits at Interop 2019. Learn from the industry's most knowledgeable IT security experts. Check out the Interop agenda here.

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
US Turning Up the Heat on North Korea's Cyber Threat Operations
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  9/16/2019
Preventing PTSD and Burnout for Cybersecurity Professionals
Craig Hinkley, CEO, WhiteHat Security,  9/16/2019
NetCAT Vulnerability Is Out of the Bag
Dark Reading Staff 9/12/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-3738
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA BSAFE Crypto-J versions prior to 6.2.5 are vulnerable to an Improper Verification of Cryptographic Signature vulnerability. A malicious remote attacker could potentially exploit this vulnerability to coerce two parties into computing the same predictable shared key.
CVE-2019-3739
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA BSAFE Crypto-J versions prior to 6.2.5 are vulnerable to Information Exposure Through Timing Discrepancy vulnerabilities during ECDSA key generation. A malicious remote attacker could potentially exploit those vulnerabilities to recover ECDSA keys.
CVE-2019-3740
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA BSAFE Crypto-J versions prior to 6.2.5 are vulnerable to an Information Exposure Through Timing Discrepancy vulnerabilities during DSA key generation. A malicious remote attacker could potentially exploit those vulnerabilities to recover DSA keys.
CVE-2019-3756
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA Archer, versions prior to 6.6 P3 (6.6.0.3), contain an information disclosure vulnerability. Information relating to the backend database gets disclosed to low-privileged RSA Archer users' UI under certain error conditions.
CVE-2019-3758
PUBLISHED: 2019-09-18
RSA Archer, versions prior to 6.6 P2 (6.6.0.2), contain an improper authentication vulnerability. The vulnerability allows sysadmins to create user accounts with insufficient credentials. Unauthenticated attackers could gain unauthorized access to the system using those accounts.