Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

7/25/2013
08:53 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Somebody's Watching You: Hacking IP Video Cameras

Major holes in network video recorders (NVRs) could result in a major physical security and privacy FAIL

Turns out those IP cameras used for physical security in businesses and homes can be easily hijacked by bad guys.

A researcher next week at the BSides Las Vegas conference will detail some key vulnerabilities he discovered in D-Link's mydlink Network Video Recorder (NVR), a storage device used to record video from cameras. The flaws, which D-Link fixed in a firmware upgrade last Friday, could allow an attacker to hack into the device and remotely control the video cameras.

Bharat Jogi, who discovered the bugs, says an NVR device is the heart of an IP video camera network. "If you want to monitor a room or something, you have eight to 10 cameras connected to" it to monitor and record video of a room or location, says Jogi, a security engineer at Qualys.

One of the flaws in the NVR leaks information from the device, including the credentials of all of the IP cameras connected to it. So a hacker could control the cameras by easily capturing usernames and passwords associated with the devices, and wrest control of them.

The NVR also can be cheated to cough up the video feeds it has stored, Jogi says. "It will give you all the details of video feeds," he says.

Another vulnerability Jogi discovered is that the device accepts any firmware: "You don't have to answer any credentials to update firmware on the device. You can upload malicious firmware" to shut it down and stop it from recording, for example, he says.

But the biggest bug he found was that the device could allow remote attackers to establish administrative accounts on the device. "You can become an admin of that device from anywhere," he says. "An attacker could send a malicious request and become admin of the device. He could [even then] view IP camera feeds from a mobile phone" remotely, he says.

"These systems are supposed to be very secure. But when you connect them to your environment, you are exposing a lot. Anyone can view it and do anything with it" if they exploit the flaws, he says.

Jogi, who will release free tools he created to test for these flaws in IP video camera networks, says the vulnerabilities could be exploited by attackers who want to target a specific company or location. "If they want to view what's going on inside a company, or if they want to have information on a company and are planning some attacks on them, this is a very good start," he says.

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Add Your Comment" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message.

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
MichaelHyatt_
50%
50%
MichaelHyatt_,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2013 | 7:11:19 PM
re: Somebody's Watching You: Hacking IP Video Cameras
The 'Internet of Things' is going to be the primary guarantor of job security in the InfoSec field for years to come...
Mobile Banking Malware Up 50% in First Half of 2019
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/17/2020
Active Directory Needs an Update: Here's Why
Raz Rafaeli, CEO and Co-Founder at Secret Double Octopus,  1/16/2020
New Attack Campaigns Suggest Emotet Threat Is Far From Over
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  1/16/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security: 2019
This Tech Digest provides a wrap up and overview of the year's top cybersecurity news stories. It was a year of new twists on old threats, with fears of another WannaCry-type worm and of a possible botnet army of Wi-Fi routers. But 2019 also underscored the risk of firmware and trusted security tools harboring dangerous holes that cybercriminals and nation-state hackers could readily abuse. Read more.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Organizations have invested in a sweeping array of security technologies to address challenges associated with the growing number of cybersecurity attacks. However, the complexity involved in managing these technologies is emerging as a major problem. Read this report to find out what your peers biggest security challenges are and the technologies they are using to address them.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-5216
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-23
In Secure Headers (RubyGem secure_headers), a directive injection vulnerability is present in versions before 3.9.0, 5.2.0, and 6.3.0. If user-supplied input was passed into append/override_content_security_policy_directives, a newline could be injected leading to limited header injection. Upon seei...
CVE-2020-5217
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-23
In Secure Headers (RubyGem secure_headers), a directive injection vulnerability is present in versions before 3.8.0, 5.1.0, and 6.2.0. If user-supplied input was passed into append/override_content_security_policy_directives, a semicolon could be injected leading to directive injection. This could b...
CVE-2020-5223
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-23
In PrivateBin versions 1.2.0 before 1.2.2, and 1.3.0 before 1.3.2, a persistent XSS attack is possible. Under certain conditions, a user provided attachment file name can inject HTML leading to a persistent Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability. The vulnerability has been fixed in PrivateBin v1.3...
CVE-2019-20399
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-23
A timing vulnerability in the Scalar::check_overflow function in Parity libsecp256k1-rs before 0.3.1 potentially allows an attacker to leak information via a side-channel attack.
CVE-2020-7915
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-22
An issue was discovered on Eaton 5P 850 devices. The Ubicacion SAI field allows XSS attacks by an administrator.