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Put Down That Comb And Take InformationWeek's 2006 Security Survey

Feeling insecure? I'm not talking about that new comb-over hairstyle you've adopted or the big new SUV you just leased, the one that takes up two highway lanes. No, I'm talking about the security of your company's IT systems and data. It's time for you to channel any nervous ene
Feeling insecure? I'm not talking about that new comb-over hairstyle you've adopted or the big new SUV you just leased, the one that takes up two highway lanes. No, I'm talking about the security of your company's IT systems and data. It's time for you to channel any nervous energy you might have about the next spyware-borne keystroke logger, portable storage device mishap, or Patch Tuesday slumber party into InformationWeek Research's U.S. Information Security Survey 2006.Last year InformationWeek was a bit surprised to learn that 84% of survey participants didn't believe their organizations were more vulnerable to malicious code attacks and security breaches than they were in 2004. Could that be progress? Or have new threats and attack vectors emerged in the past year?

There's been no shortage of new and creative technologies and techniques designed to compromise your company's data and sully its good name. Armies of security researchers remind us daily that vendors have much work to do when it comes to providing securely written software and operating systems. And those Web applications that your customers love and that remove costly overhead from your organization's budget could turn out to be your worst enemy. Is open-source security software the answer?

Last year's survey indicated that IT executives were most concerned about the increased sophistication of security threats. Another concern was the proliferation of ways in which companies could be compromised, with wireless attack vectors expected to play a larger role. Have this year's security woes played out as you thought they would? Are you getting the help you need from IT vendors, industry analysts, and service providers?

Now's the time to be heard. Help InformationWeek continue to provide you with the most relevant coverage of the latest security successes and failures. This is a chance to learn from the best source of information available: your peers.

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