Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Perimeter

11/27/2011
09:33 AM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
50%
50%

Partner Management: Assessing Compliance Capability And Willingness

The first step is to determine the partner's understanding of its responsibility and ability to comply

Regulations like HIPAA and state privacy regulations and contracts like PCI DSS require organizations to ensure that any partner or service provider with access to data covered under the regulation or contract complies with the data protection requirements. In my previous post, I discussed the need to assess and control the risk associated with these relationships. However, it is can be a challenge to assess an organization’s ability to protect the data.

In fact, there is an important aspect of compliance that many organizations miss: Does the vendor even understand its compliance requirements?

Before embarking on a detailed assessment of an organization’s compliance and security programs, all organizations considering consuming a service that would be involved in protecting regulated information should ask the vendor whether it recognizes its responsibilities.

It is often surprising to find that service providers that manage protected health information, personal identifying information, and payment card information have no idea what controls what they should have in place. Equally surprising is the fact that consumers of the service have the false impression that the vendor is completely aware of its protection “responsibilities” and has accepted them.

Organizations entrusted with protected information are responsible for the practices of their vendors. Normally, vendors are contractually responsible for protecting the information. In poorly managed relationships, however, the consuming organization doesn’t make the requirement clear and allows the vendor to either be ignorant of the presence of protected information or believe that detailed understanding of regulatory requirements isn’t important.

Service consumers should be aware of an important point: You cannot force a vendor to comply with a regulation it doesn’t understand or hasn’t acknowledged by contract. It is for this reason that data protection regulations require contracts between data owners and service providers. All entities need to understand their requirements.

Once this understanding is established, the service consumer can assess whether the compliance program and security controls will meet its requirements.

In my next post, I’ll describe different methods for assessing partner practices, and the pros and cons of each.

Richard Mackey is vice president of consulting at SystemExperts Corp.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
7 Old IT Things Every New InfoSec Pro Should Know
Joan Goodchild, Staff Editor,  4/20/2021
News
Cloud-Native Businesses Struggle With Security
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  5/6/2021
Commentary
Defending Against Web Scraping Attacks
Rob Simon, Principal Security Consultant at TrustedSec,  5/7/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win an Amazon Gift Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: What Virtual Reality phishing attacks will look like in 2030.
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-21652
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
A cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in Jenkins Xray - Test Management for Jira Plugin 2.4.0 and earlier allows attackers to connect to an attacker-specified URL using attacker-specified credentials IDs obtained through another method, capturing credentials stored in Jenkins.
CVE-2021-21653
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
Jenkins Xray - Test Management for Jira Plugin 2.4.0 and earlier does not perform a permission check in an HTTP endpoint, allowing with Overall/Read permission to enumerate credentials IDs of credentials stored in Jenkins.
CVE-2021-21654
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
Jenkins P4 Plugin 1.11.4 and earlier does not perform permission checks in multiple HTTP endpoints, allowing attackers with Overall/Read permission to connect to an attacker-specified Perforce server using attacker-specified username and password.
CVE-2021-21655
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
A cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in Jenkins P4 Plugin 1.11.4 and earlier allows attackers to connect to an attacker-specified Perforce server using attacker-specified username and password.
CVE-2021-21656
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
Jenkins Xcode integration Plugin 2.0.14 and earlier does not configure its XML parser to prevent XML external entity (XXE) attacks.