Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

8/21/2012
05:49 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Most Paid Apple iOS, Google Android Apps Have Been Hacked

New study finds that less than 5 percent of popular mobile apps use professional-grade defenses

Bad actors are hacking and repackaging the most popular paid and free apps for Apple iOS and Google Android devices, a new study finds.

Ninety-two percent of the top 100 paid Apple iOS apps and 100 percent of top 100 paid Android apps have been hacked, says Arxan Technologies in its new report, "State of Security in the App Economy: Mobile Apps Under Attack." The report is based on the study of 230 top apps, both paid and free, for Apple's iOS and Google's Android devices.

Not surprisingly, free apps are also at the mercy of these attackers, with 40 percent of free iOS apps having been hacked, and 80 percent of free Android apps in the same boat.

"We wanted to provide a new, fact-based perspective on the hacking threats that app owners/providers face after releasing their app," says Jukka Alanen, vice president of Arxan. So the report looks at the issues from the developer's perspective rather than the end user's, he says.

How are cybercriminals abusing these mobile apps? By disabling or bypassing security features, unlocking or changing features, selling pirated versions, stealing source code, and spreading malware-infected versions of them, the report says. Gaming, business, productivity, financial services, social networking, entertainment, communication, and healthcare apps are all being targeted.

"So, while piracy is common, there's a wide variety of hacking attack types that we found. All of these attacks can cause significant damage to the application vendor/owner," Alanen says.

Arxan studied hacked versions of mobile apps found on third-party sites outside of Apple App Store and Google Play, such as Cydia, third-party mobile app distribution sites, hacker/cracker sites, and others. "We did not review whether the original applications in Apple App Store or Google Play were already compromised in some way, but know anecdotally that some of the malware found in official app markets has been based on repackaged versions of other pre-existing applications redistributed with malware," Alanen says.

The attackers typically reverse-engineer the app's code and then retool it for their own purposes. "This process is made easy with widely available free or low-cost hacking tools," the Arxan reports says.

App developers are expected to soon take a hit financially, as well, in the wake of this activity, the report says. Mobile app revenues are expected to hit more than $60 billion by 2016, and the volume of mobile payments to hit $1 trillion, according to data from KPMG, ABI Research, and TechNavio.

And yet fewer than 5 percent of popular mobile apps use what Arxan calls "professional-grade" defenses, such as multiple layers of protection, for tamper-resistance.

The study found that some hacked versions of these popular apps had been downloaded more than 500,000 times from these unofficial third-party sites, so users aren't just getting their apps from authorized Apple and Google app stores.

Even so, it's not just those unofficial third-party sites that are dangerous. "It is very important to understand that users do not need to download apps from third-party sites for app owners to suffer from hacking attacks. Intellectual Property (IP) and decompiled source code can be stolen without the hacker republishing the app on third-party sites," according to Arxan's report. "Furthermore, hackers can republish hacked apps on official app stores (e.g., under a different app name). Finally, merely the known existence of a hacked and tampered version can damage the app owner's brand and customers' trust, even if few users download the hacked version."

Arxan won't name names of the hacked apps, however. "Arxan's intention is not to call out any specific app maker or developer for potential security flaws. Rather, we're trying to educate all of the key stakeholders in the broader App Economy about the potential dangers that are out there, as well as some best practices to begin to address this issue," Alanen says.

The full report from Arxan is available for download here.

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Add Your Comment" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message. Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
44% of Security Threats Start in the Cloud
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  2/19/2020
Zero-Factor Authentication: Owning Our Data
Nick Selby, Chief Security Officer at Paxos Trust Company,  2/19/2020
Firms Improve Threat Detection but Face Increasingly Disruptive Attacks
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  2/20/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
The concept of application security is well known, but application security testing and remediation processes remain unbalanced. Most organizations are confident in their approach to AppSec, although others seem to have no approach at all. Read this report to find out more.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-9351
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-23
An issue was discovered in SmartClient 12.0. If an unauthenticated attacker makes a POST request to /tools/developerConsoleOperations.jsp or /isomorphic/IDACall with malformed XML data in the _transaction parameter, the server replies with a verbose error showing where the application resides (the a...
CVE-2020-9352
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-23
An issue was discovered in SmartClient 12.0. Unauthenticated exploitation of blind XXE can occur in the downloadWSDL feature by sending a POST request to /tools/developerConsoleOperations.jsp with a valid payload in the _transaction parameter.
CVE-2020-9353
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-23
An issue was discovered in SmartClient 12.0. The Remote Procedure Call (RPC) loadFile provided by the console functionality on the /tools/developerConsoleOperations.jsp (or /isomorphic/IDACall) URL is affected by unauthenticated Local File Inclusion via directory-traversal sequences in the elem XML ...
CVE-2020-9354
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-23
An issue was discovered in SmartClient 12.0. The Remote Procedure Call (RPC) saveFile provided by the console functionality on the /tools/developerConsoleOperations.jsp (or /isomorphic/IDACall) URL allows an unauthenticated attacker to overwrite files via vectors involving an XML comment and /.. pat...
CVE-2020-9355
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-23
danfruehauf NetworkManager-ssh before 1.2.11 allows privilege escalation because extra options are mishandled.