Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Perimeter

10/7/2011
04:11 PM
John H. Sawyer
John H. Sawyer
Commentary
50%
50%

DerbyCon Fosters Community -- Videos Available Online

DerbyCon's successful first year reminds us of what the security community is all about: sharing and learning from others, promoting new ideas, and advancing the art of security

After spending this past weekend in Louisville, I've finally experienced one of the best conferences I've ever been to: DerbyCon. I'll admit that my conference experience has been limited to DefCon, Black Hat, ShmooCon, B-Sides Las Vegas, and SANS -- all of which have their pros and cons -- but I think they serve as a good sampling of what's out there.

What I've found is that security conferences, no matter how awesome their content, are often hindered by the sheer number of people (and attitudes) in attendance and the overwhelming choice of (good and bad) content. DerbyCon had a great mix of both, including a refreshing sense of a community striving to change the broken security industry for the better.

As a first-year conference, DerbyCon came out swinging with a great lineup of speakers, including Dave Kennedy, Jayson Street, Chris Nickerson, Carlos Perez, and Chris Gates. While I was disappointed with some of the content, most of it lived up to the hype, and everyone I talked to had a couple of favorites that they really enjoyed, like Gates and Rob Fuller's "The Dirty Little Secrets They Didn’t Teach You In Pentesting Class," and Kevin Johnson and Tom Eston's "Desktop Betrayal: Exploiting Clients Through The Features They Demand."

In addition to the talks, there was a capture-the-flag competition, a lock-picking and hardware hacking area, and a "hacker" movie marathon. The vendor area had several tables with groups like No Starch Press, Pwnie Express, Hackers for Charity, and Hak5 with things to sell or items to auction to help promote a good cause.

One thing I picked up while there was a USB Rubber Ducky from Hak5. The quickest and simplest explanation is that it is a hardware-based attack device that acts like a USB HID device (i.e., USB keyboard). Plug it into a target machine, and it will inject keystrokes to change system settings, open a backdoor, or shovel a command shell back out to an attacker's machine. It's an interesting attack device that will likely have its own blog entry here once I've had more time to play with it.

I want to thank Dave (Rel1k) Kennedy, Adrian (Irongeek) Crenshaw, the other organizers, and volunteers for making DerbyCon a great success. My friends and I have already made plans to meet up again for DerbyCon 2.0. See you there.

Check out the videos from the DerbyCon presentations here, thanks to Irongeek.

John Sawyer is a Senior Security Analyst with InGuardians. The views and opinions expressed in this blog are his own and do not represent the views and opinions of his employer. He can be reached at [email protected] and found on Twitter @johnhsawyer.

 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 8/3/2020
'BootHole' Vulnerability Exposes Secure Boot Devices to Attack
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  7/29/2020
Out-of-Date and Unsupported Cloud Workloads Continue as a Common Weakness
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/28/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-4560
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-03
IBM Financial Transaction Manager 3.2.4 is vulnerable to cross-site scripting. This vulnerability allows users to embed arbitrary JavaScript code in the Web UI thus altering the intended functionality potentially leading to credentials disclosure within a trusted session.
CVE-2019-4589
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-03
IBM Cognos Analytics 11.0 and 11.1 is vulnerable to privlege escalation where the "My schedules and subscriptions" page is visible and accessible to a less privileged user. IBM X-Force ID: 167449.
CVE-2020-4328
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-03
IBM Financial Transaction Manager 3.2.4 is vulnerable to SQL injection. A remote attacker could send specially-crafted SQL statements, which could allow the attacker to view, add, modify or delete information in the back-end database. IBM X-Force ID: 177839.
CVE-2020-4377
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-03
IBM Cognos Anaytics 11.0 and 11.1 is vulnerable to an XML External Entity Injection (XXE) attack when processing XML data. A remote attacker could exploit this vulnerability to expose sensitive information or consume memory resources. IBM X-Force ID: 179156.
CVE-2020-4534
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-03
IBM WebSphere Application Server 7.0, 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 could allow a local authenticated attacker to gain elevated privileges on the system, caused by improper handling of UNC paths. By scheduling a task with a specially-crafted UNC path, an attacker could exploit this vulnerability to execute arbi...