Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

Bucking Law Enforcement's Borders

New agreement could make it easier for cops to pursue privacy violators across geographic lines

An international body of 30 developed nations has quietly reached an agreement that may help law enforcement agencies to find and prosecute violators of privacy laws across international boundaries.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) -- an organization that includes most of North America and Western Europe as well as Korea and Japan -- last month adopted new guidelines -- "Recommendation on Cross-Border Cooperation in the Enforcement of the Laws Protecting Privacy" -- that could make life tougher for international identity thieves and other privacy law violators.

Currently, many breakers of privacy laws escape because of the ham-handed handoff between law enforcement agencies in different countries, experts agree. (See New Laws Don't Solve Global Problems and Senate OKs Controversial Internet Treaty.)

The OECD agreement, in a nutshell, says the cops in the organization's 30 countries should help each other to nab these border-crossing perpetrators.

Initially, the recommendation focuses on ensuring that each member country has privacy laws in place, and that there are mechanisms for sharing information about privacy violators and a central authority for collecting that information. Having established an infrastructure, the document suggests methods for improving communication among agencies that enforce privacy laws.

The OECD does not include some of the nations most often reputed to harbor spammers and privacy violators, such as Nigeria and Russia. The recommendations do invite non-member countries to participate in the law enforcement effort.

— Tim Wilson, Site Editor, Dark Reading

Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How to Better Secure Your Microsoft 365 Environment
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/25/2021
Attackers Leave Stolen Credentials Searchable on Google
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/21/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
2020: The Year in Security
Download this Tech Digest for a look at the biggest security stories that - so far - have shaped a very strange and stressful year.
Flash Poll
Assessing Cybersecurity Risk in Today's Enterprises
Assessing Cybersecurity Risk in Today's Enterprises
COVID-19 has created a new IT paradigm in the enterprise -- and a new level of cybersecurity risk. This report offers a look at how enterprises are assessing and managing cyber-risk under the new normal.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-3326
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-27
The iconv function in the GNU C Library (aka glibc or libc6) 2.32 and earlier, when processing invalid input sequences in the ISO-2022-JP-3 encoding, fails an assertion in the code path and aborts the program, potentially resulting in a denial of service.
CVE-2021-22641
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-27
A heap-based buffer overflow issue has been identified in the way the application processes project files, allowing an attacker to craft a special project file that may allow arbitrary code execution on the Tellus Lite V-Simulator and V-Server Lite (versions prior to 4.0.10.0).
CVE-2021-22653
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-27
Multiple out-of-bounds write issues have been identified in the way the application processes project files, allowing an attacker to craft a special project file that may allow arbitrary code execution on the Tellus Lite V-Simulator and V-Server Lite (versions prior to 4.0.10.0).
CVE-2021-22655
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-27
Multiple out-of-bounds read issues have been identified in the way the application processes project files, allowing an attacker to craft a special project file that may allow arbitrary code execution on the Tellus Lite V-Simulator and V-Server Lite (versions prior to 4.0.10.0).
CVE-2021-26276
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-27
** DISPUTED ** scripts/cli.js in the GoDaddy node-config-shield (aka Config Shield) package before 0.2.2 for Node.js calls eval when processing a set command. NOTE: the vendor reportedly states that this is not a vulnerability. The set command was not intended for use with untrusted data.