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Risk

8/14/2020
11:00 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Ways to Keep Your Remote Workforce Safe

These tips will help you chart a course for a security strategy that just may become part of the normal way organizations will function over the next several years.
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Working from home is not going away anytime soon. Cases in point: Amazon's staff will work from home until after the first of the year, while Google's team will stay home until July 2021.

Whether your company takes its lead from the big tech companies or plans a gradual return, it's clear that security pros have to accept their jobs are now to run a workable security model at a time when the traditional network perimeter has been all but obliterated.

In talking to a series of industry experts, it became clear that new approaches are needed given that security teams have for years run their remote access operations over a limited amount of VPN connections. Now they have to find better ways to segment networks and lock down applications. Security teams also need to set up "virtual water coolers" where their remote staffs can report incidents and discuss technology issues.

Here are seven tips to chart a course for a security strategy that just may become part of the normal way organizations will function over the next several years. Face it: We're not going back to the way it was. 

 

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio
 

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ccie8030
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ccie8030,
User Rank: Author
8/14/2020 | 11:35:44 AM
User security education
Great suggestions in this article, I believe user security awareness training should be incorporated throughout the process.  
Shih-Chin Yang
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Shih-Chin Yang,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/18/2020 | 1:24:22 AM
Encrypting sensitive information before sending it to the cloud
Great Article! Constantly educating the workforce about cybersecurity is key to success.

We also constantly tell our workforce to always encrypt sensitive information before sending it to the cloud. The email itself is not secure for protecting sensitive information. Even though cloud storage services providers such as Google Drive, One Drive, DropBox are convenient to use, but for sensitive data, it worths adding an extra layer of protection by client-side encryption.

A successful intranet site makes data constantly available 24x7, it is really great for a remote workforce. Imagine that you need to look up lab data when other colleagues are not around.  On the other hand, if you host an intranet site on the cloud, it is not really a good idea without end-to-end encryption. Since the staff at cloud service providers could potentially see your data if you don't encrypt with your own key. Your data could be the lifeboat for your organization.

The recently hacked Twitter is a good example of how the internal threats inside cloud service providers could possibly cause a data breach. That's why Senator Ron Wyden also called for Twitter to end-to-end encrypt DMs after the hack.

When encryption is done right, it would improve productivity, together with modern cloud services and web technology, it is very cost-effective.

Hopefully, this helps.

Shih-Chin Yang
harrysonphord
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harrysonphord,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/18/2020 | 8:06:28 AM
Re: Encrypting sensitive information before sending it to the cloud
Found a few useful tips but nothing new, actually.
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