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Risk

3/17/2021
09:30 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Tips to Secure the Enterprise Against Tax Scams

Tax season is yet another opportunity for fraudsters to target your company. Here's how to keep everyone in the organization on their toes.
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Set Up Cross-Company Awareness Training
As a first step, enterprise security teams must educate employees about tax-related scams, such as phishing and business email compromise (BEC), says Hank Schless, senior manager, security solutions at Lookout. Attackers also like to pose as members of the IRS or even the organization's internal accounting department to socially engineer employees into sharing sensitive tax-related information, such as Social Security numbers or bank account information, so they must be on guard. 
'Posing as part of the IT team puts attackers into a role with greater authority and credibility than traditional phishing,' Schless says. 
In addition, attackers often leverage a number of tactics, including sending malicious message attachments that deploy malware; sending fake authentication messages through SMS that convince an employee to enter their login credentials on a malicious site; or calling employees by phone to direct them to visit a phishing page to access allegedly compromised tax documents.
Digital Shadows' Holland also suggests awareness training based on specific security threats. For example, base training on IRS-issued fraud alerts. And tailor training to the team taking it, as well. For example, a finance team member falling for a scam could have more serious consequences than for other departments.    
Image Source: Adobe Stock: Leowolfert

Set Up Cross-Company Awareness Training

As a first step, enterprise security teams must educate employees about tax-related scams, such as phishing and business email compromise (BEC), says Hank Schless, senior manager, security solutions at Lookout. Attackers also like to pose as members of the IRS or even the organization's internal accounting department to socially engineer employees into sharing sensitive tax-related information, such as Social Security numbers or bank account information, so they must be on guard.

"Posing as part of the IT team puts attackers into a role with greater authority and credibility than traditional phishing," Schless says.

In addition, attackers often leverage a number of tactics, including sending malicious message attachments that deploy malware; sending fake authentication messages through SMS that convince an employee to enter their login credentials on a malicious site; or calling employees by phone to direct them to visit a phishing page to access allegedly compromised tax documents.

Digital Shadows' Holland also suggests awareness training based on specific security threats. For example, base training on IRS-issued fraud alerts. And tailor training to the team taking it, as well. For example, a finance team member falling for a scam could have more serious consequences than for other departments.

Image Source: Adobe Stock: Leowolfert

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