Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

6/18/2010
10:43 AM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
50%
50%

Why Aren't Health Organizations Embracing Cloud Storage?

As hospitals around the world move from paper-based records to electronic systems, they cited disaster recovery as one of their top priorities. While prepping for disaster is good business, shouldn't something else be a priority on the agenda of those embracing more health IT?

As hospitals around the world move from paper-based records to electronic systems, they cited disaster recovery as one of their top priorities. While prepping for disaster is good business, shouldn't something else be a priority on the agenda of those embracing more health IT?Where's the health care industry's focus on security? That was my initial thought when I reviewed the partially released survey [.pdf] results from storage provider BridgeHead Software. Their survey found that the top health IT spending priority for 2010, coming in at 44 percent, was disaster recovery. That led Picture and Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) with 38 percent and scanning paper documents at 35 percent.

No doubt the storage demands in health care are growing as rapidly - if not more so - than any other industry. In a previous survey, the same group found that more than 69 percent of health care companies foresee their data storage to increase because of more digitized imaging files, patient records, and other related documentation.

Surprisingly, only 15 percent of respondents listed cloud storage as a priority.

Let's hope it's not security concerns that's keeping health care organizations from adopting cloud-based storage. Why? Because it would be near impossible for a dedicated cloud provider to do any worse than most health care organizations at securing sensitive patient data.

Let's take a look at search results of medical related breaches from the Dataloss Database operated by the Open Security Foundation. A cursory overview of recent data breaches show stolen hard drives, stolen notebooks, stolen PCs, and lost removable media top the list of most common cause of data breaches at health care organizations.

Some of the more recent data security blunders include a stolen drive with an undetermined number of patient records that contained names, Social Security Numbers, and medical details. Another includes a stolen laptop with more than 64,000 patient records. And yet another incident involves a stolen portable drive with 180,111 billion service reports.

According to the Dataloss Database, as of now, there have been several thousand such health care related data breaches involving millions of patient records.

Perhaps, along with their disaster recovery efforts, health care organizations should take a thorough review of their storage and data security policies and enforcement efforts. Something has to be done to improve the abysmal state of health IT security.

And, actually, it looks as if the best way to do that is to do everything they can to get digitized patient data as far away from their own systems as possible.

For my security and technology observations throughout the day, consider following me on Twitter.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Zero-Factor Authentication: Owning Our Data
Nick Selby, Chief Security Officer at Paxos Trust Company,  2/19/2020
44% of Security Threats Start in the Cloud
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  2/19/2020
Ransomware Damage Hit $11.5B in 2019
Dark Reading Staff 2/20/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
The concept of application security is well known, but application security testing and remediation processes remain unbalanced. Most organizations are confident in their approach to AppSec, although others seem to have no approach at all. Read this report to find out more.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-5524
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-21
Aterm series (Aterm WF1200C firmware Ver1.2.1 and earlier, Aterm WG1200CR firmware Ver1.2.1 and earlier, Aterm WG2600HS firmware Ver1.3.2 and earlier) allows an attacker on the same network segment to execute arbitrary OS commands with root privileges via UPnP function.
CVE-2020-5525
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-21
Aterm series (Aterm WF1200C firmware Ver1.2.1 and earlier, Aterm WG1200CR firmware Ver1.2.1 and earlier, Aterm WG2600HS firmware Ver1.3.2 and earlier) allows an authenticated attacker on the same network segment to execute arbitrary OS commands with root privileges via management screen.
CVE-2020-5533
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-21
Cross-site scripting vulnerability in Aterm WG2600HS firmware Ver1.3.2 and earlier allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors.
CVE-2020-5534
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-21
Aterm WG2600HS firmware Ver1.3.2 and earlier allows an authenticated attacker on the same network segment to execute arbitrary OS commands with root privileges via unspecified vectors.
CVE-2014-7914
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-21
btif/src/btif_dm.c in Android before 5.1 does not properly enforce the temporary nature of a Bluetooth pairing, which allows user-assisted remote attackers to bypass intended access restrictions via crafted Bluetooth packets after the tapping of a crafted NFC tag.