Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

10/11/2008
12:00 AM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
50%
50%

Stop #1, Munich. Made It

I rolled into Munich this morning on the S1 train from the airport, looking forward to public transportation but instead ran smack dab into the Munich Marathon, which means that streets were blocked off and the trams shut down. Oh well, I could have rented a bicycle, but I'm too lazy for that, even though Munich is a bicycle kind of town. I would have rented a motor scooter, but Munich doesn't appear to be a motor scooter burg. Except for those three guys on Vespas who about took me ou

I rolled into Munich this morning on the S1 train from the airport, looking forward to public transportation but instead ran smack dab into the Munich Marathon, which means that streets were blocked off and the trams shut down. Oh well, I could have rented a bicycle, but I'm too lazy for that, even though Munich is a bicycle kind of town. I would have rented a motor scooter, but Munich doesn't appear to be a motor scooter burg. Except for those three guys on Vespas who about took me out when I had a the rightaway to cross.

Problems with transportation notwithstanding, I didn't waste any time seeing what sights I could. Contrary to rumors, Augustiner's Beer Hall wasn't my first stop. Okay, I admit it was my second stop, but it was lunchtime and that sausage and saurkraut was pretty doggone good. Not to mention what the beer hall is really famous for.

No my first stop was the Deutsches Museum , a marvelous collection that's considered the world's largest museum of technology and engineering. It has an outstanding exhibit of cryptography devices, including an Enigma encoding machine from World War II, and amazing mechanical avatars, among other computer-related exhibits. For example, on exhibit is a UNIVAC 1 -- one of 49 ever built. One of the reasons so few were built is that the computer sold for more than $1 million each and weighed 19 tons. (Now tell me again how heavy your laptop is?) The UNIVAC 1's CPU had over 975,000 individual components. Overall, the computer had more than 5600 vacuum tubes, 18,000 diodes, and 300 relays. This particular UNIVAC 1 was operational from 1956 until 1963.

Then there was the Zuse KG Model 24, a computer I've heard about but never thought I'd see. This machine, originally named the V4, as started in 1942 as a result of good experiences with the Z3, and was finished in 1945, and presented to the museum in 1960. The Zuse 24 used binary floating-point numbers with 23-bit mantissa,  6-bit exponent and 1 sign bit for the exponent, giving a word length of 23 bits. It has two simultaneouis arithmetic units for mantissa and exponent, parallel addition. Bests the four basic arthmetic operations, the functions implemented use squaring, extraction of square roots, and multiplication by different constants. It supported mechanical main storage for 64 words (expandable to 500 words). Data and program input was via operator panel or film reader; static program with a maximum of two loops.

In 1950 the system was enhanced which increased average processing times to 30 operations per minute. Now tell me again about your slow laptop.

If or when you're in Munich, don't miss the Deutsches Museum. And be prepared to spend more than one day there. It's worth it. In the meantime, it's back to work for me, just in case the boss happens to be reading this.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Manchester United Suffers Cyberattack
Dark Reading Staff 11/23/2020
As 'Anywhere Work' Evolves, Security Will Be Key Challenge
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  11/23/2020
Cloud Security Startup Lightspin Emerges From Stealth
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  11/24/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win an Amazon Gift Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-29367
PUBLISHED: 2020-11-27
blosc2.c in Blosc C-Blosc2 through 2.0.0.beta.5 has a heap-based buffer overflow when there is a lack of space to write compressed data.
CVE-2020-26245
PUBLISHED: 2020-11-27
npm package systeminformation before version 4.30.5 is vulnerable to Prototype Pollution leading to Command Injection. The issue was fixed with a rewrite of shell sanitations to avoid prototyper pollution problems. The issue is fixed in version 4.30.5. If you cannot upgrade, be sure to check or sani...
CVE-2017-15682
PUBLISHED: 2020-11-27
In Crafter CMS Crafter Studio 3.0.1 an unauthenticated attacker is able to inject malicious JavaScript code resulting in a stored/blind XSS in the admin panel.
CVE-2017-15683
PUBLISHED: 2020-11-27
In Crafter CMS Crafter Studio 3.0.1 an unauthenticated attacker is able to create a site with specially crafted XML that allows the retrieval of OS files out-of-band.
CVE-2017-15684
PUBLISHED: 2020-11-27
Crafter CMS Crafter Studio 3.0.1 has a directory traversal vulnerability which allows unauthenticated attackers to view files from the operating system.