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8/20/2008
06:44 AM
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Security Solutions Arriving for Virtualized Systems

New technology typically emerges one step ahead of needed security checks. That has been the case with the recent push to virtualized systems although one leading vendor is trying to alter that equation.

New technology typically emerges one step ahead of needed security checks. That has been the case with the recent push to virtualized systems although one leading vendor is trying to alter that equation.Virtualization is gaining traction because it has the potential to help businesses use their hardware more efficiently. As small and medium businesses begin to deploy such solutions, the question arises, How can we ensure these systems are secure? Answers to that question often have typically begun with a pregnant pause.

CheckPoint, one of the leading security suppliers, stepped up to fill the void. The companys VPN-1 Virtual Edition, which runs on runs on VMwares popular ESX or ESXi platforms, features VPN and firewall functions and can be integrated with CheckPoints unified threat management systems. The security software runs on the machine hosting the virtualization software and protects virtual machines from one another. The security product simplifies auditing, compliance and risk management requirements by providing unified logging for a companys entire security infrastructure, including its virtual systems.

Virtualized systems have been gaining lot of traction, and Microsofts (a platform that the CheckPoint system does not yet support) growing emphasis on this market segment should at least maintain the momentum. One challenge is these solutions are usually quite expensive; pricing for the CheckPoint software starts in the $1,000 per virtual machine range. While many small and medium businesses may still be searching for a business case to justify deployment of virtualized systems, those planning to move ahead with such deployments can now find needed security functions.

How much interest does your company have in virtualized systems? How concerned are you about the security features available with these systems?

 

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