Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

2/9/2009
08:02 PM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
50%
50%

Metasploit To (Almost) Go SaaS

The Metasploit hacking tool is going the direction of many other IT security tools: it's going to be delivered, in part, as a service. But will corporate security managers upload critical data to a third party to test to see if it can be cracked?

The Metasploit hacking tool is going the direction of many other IT security tools: it's going to be delivered, in part, as a service. But will corporate security managers upload critical data to a third party to test to see if it can be cracked?We've covered, on a number of occasions, how security is increasingly being delivered as a service. Last year it was MessageLabs being acquired by Symantec, Symplified and its identity management as a service, and then there's Qualys, which launched its SaaS vulnerability management appliance at the turn of this decade.

This time, it's a step toward SaaS for the popular open source penetration-testing tool, Metasploit. As Kelly Jackson Higgins reports at DarkReading:

While this is not a pure software-as-a-services model, the new service-based features are a departure from Metasploit's software-based approach. The goal is to add back-end services, such as an "opcode" database client and a password-cracker to Metasploit, that seamlessly expand the tool's features and resources for its users, says HD Moore, creator of Metasploit. "We want our regular users to be able to take advantage of [such] services transparently," Moore says.

Sounds interesting, right? Other security vendors have been providing security through software-as-service for years. But one of the upcoming services HD Moore discussed with Kelly Jackson Higgins is in a back-end password cracking service, where a user would upload password hashes to Metasploit:

With the back-end password-cracking service, a Metasploit user could automatically submit password hashes to the Metasploit platform. "Once they are finished, [they would] get the clear-text passwords back and use those for another exploit," he says.

HD Moore says he's working to address one of the obvious problems with such services, such as criminals uploading password hashes that belong to an organization they're trying to crack into. This wouldn't be good, to say the least. One of the options he's considering as a way to stop this abuse is some type of user registration and confirmation.

But forget outright criminal abuse for a moment. Would many corporate security managers feel comfortable uploading actual password hashes to a third party? How would auditors react to learning about such practices?

I'm very curious to learn the answer to those questions.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
News
FluBot Malware's Rapid Spread May Soon Hit US Phones
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  4/28/2021
Slideshows
7 Modern-Day Cybersecurity Realities
Steve Zurier, Contributing Writer,  4/30/2021
Commentary
How to Secure Employees' Home Wi-Fi Networks
Bert Kashyap, CEO and Co-Founder at SecureW2,  4/28/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-24259
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-05
The “Elementor Addon Elements� WordPress Plugin before 1.11.2 has several widgets that are vulnerable to stored Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) by lower-privileged users such as contributors, all via a similar method.
CVE-2021-24260
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-05
The “Livemesh Addons for Elementor� WordPress Plugin before 6.8 has several widgets that are vulnerable to stored Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) by lower-privileged users such as contributors, all via a similar method.
CVE-2021-24261
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-05
The “HT Mega – Absolute Addons for Elementor Page Builder� WordPress Plugin before 1.5.7 has several widgets that are vulnerable to stored Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) by ...
CVE-2021-24262
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-05
The “WooLentor – WooCommerce Elementor Addons + Builder� WordPress Plugin before 1.8.6 has a widget that is vulnerable to stored Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) by lower-priv...
CVE-2021-24263
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-05
The “Elementor Addons – PowerPack Addons for Elementor� WordPress Plugin before 2.3.2 for WordPress has several widgets that are vulnerable to stored Cross-Site Scriptin...