Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Risk

5/14/2010
11:34 AM
Keith Ferrell
Keith Ferrell
Commentary
50%
50%

If You Kill Your Company's Facebook Page, Make Sure You Kill It Dead

Whether or not the "Kill My Facebook" movement achieves critical mass, there are a few things you need to know before eliminating your company's Facebook presence. Most of all, how to make sure that "not only is it merely dead, it's really most sincerely dead."

Whether or not the "Kill My Facebook" movement achieves critical mass, there are a few things you need to know before eliminating your company's Facebook presence. Most of all, how to make sure that "not only is it merely dead, it's really most sincerely dead."Deactivate your Facebook account or delete it altogether?

That 's the question a growing number of businesses and individuals are starting to ask.

The deactivate Facebook -- and the smaller, more extreme "Kill My Facebook" -- response to the company's over-reach when it comes to personal (and business) information, as well as the amount of time managing a Facebook account requires, among other reasons for ditching your Facebook presence, may or may not achieve critical mass.

But judging from news reports about urgent company meetings to discuss privacy issues, as well as Congressional inquiries into those issues, matters are getting the company's attention.

If your business maintains a Facebook presence, those matters should get some attention from your company as well.

That attention may or may not include reading Facebook's privacy policy, which is almost 1300 words longer than the (unamended) United States Constitution. Who has the time? And the answer to that question -- next to none of us -- may well be one of the things Facebook is counting on.

Inertia, when you have 400 million users, and are the leader in online display ads, is a powerful engine.

So if you want your business information shared throughout the Internet -- as opposed to only with your business's followers -- don't do anything. That's the default Facebook position -- you post it, they'll share it.

If you want to take more control of how your information is used and shared by Facebook, visit your Account Settings, and get ready to spend some click-time establishing the privacy parameters that best suit your business -- and doing so within Facebook's dozens of privacy settings and close to 200 options.

If you want to take a break from Facebook, waiting to see how the various controversies shake out and whether or not Facebook's information-sharing policies are adjusted, choose the Deactivate option, which hides your account from other users (not from Facebook itself) and keeps it hidden until you decide to reactivate it (which Facebook clearly bets you will do).

But if you've had it with Facebook and its privacy-issue/controversy-of-the-day, then Delete My Account is the way to go -- once you wend your way through the complexities of doing so.

Deleting your account is a permanent and irrevocable move... once you get through the up to two-week waiting period before Facebook actually deletes your info.

Or at least deletes that information that the company doesn't feel it needs -- and has a right -- to hold onto for "technical reasons."

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Cybersecurity Team Holiday Guide: 2019 Gag Gift Edition
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer,  12/2/2019
Navigating Security in the Cloud
Diya Jolly, Chief Product Officer, Okta,  12/4/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Navigating the Deluge of Security Data
In this Tech Digest, Dark Reading shares the experiences of some top security practitioners as they navigate volumes of security data. We examine some examples of how enterprises can cull this data to find the clues they need.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-19647
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-09
radare2 through 4.0.0 lacks validation of the content variable in the function r_asm_pseudo_incbin at libr/asm/asm.c, ultimately leading to an arbitrary write. This allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (application crash) or possibly have unspecified other impact via crafted input.
CVE-2019-19648
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-09
In the macho_parse_file functionality in macho/macho.c of YARA 3.11.0, command_size may be inconsistent with the real size. A specially crafted MachO file can cause an out-of-bounds memory access, resulting in Denial of Service (application crash) or potential code execution.
CVE-2019-19642
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-08
On SuperMicro X8STi-F motherboards with IPMI firmware 2.06 and BIOS 02.68, the Virtual Media feature allows OS Command Injection by authenticated attackers who can send HTTP requests to the IPMI IP address. This requires a POST to /rpc/setvmdrive.asp with shell metacharacters in ShareHost or ShareNa...
CVE-2019-19637
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-08
An issue was discovered in libsixel 1.8.2. There is an integer overflow in the function sixel_decode_raw_impl at fromsixel.c.
CVE-2019-19638
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-08
An issue was discovered in libsixel 1.8.2. There is a heap-based buffer overflow in the function load_pnm at frompnm.c, due to an integer overflow.