Perimeter

Richard Bejtlich Talks Business Security Strategy, US Security Policy

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Richard Bejtlich, chief security strategist of FireEye, talks to senior editor Sara Peters at the Dark Reading News Desk at Black Hat about what should really be driving your security department's strategy. Plus he discusses law enforcement agencies' efforts to put backdoors in encryption solutions and how the government is responding to technology's improved abilities to provide attribution for cybercrime.

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RogerB679
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RogerB679,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/26/2015 | 12:32:32 PM
Security Strategy
I agree with Richard Bejtlich on the shifting views of collecting, storing and protecting data.  The traditional way of handling information is changing, but the policies/laws/and practices are lagging behind. On a side note, I remember talks with Richard as far back as 1999.  We where both in the AFCERT at the time developing tactics, techniques, and procedures for the myriad of emerging threats. I do remember a conversation in which we would see a time where business and security would merge to create an economic strategy that essentially would dictate the success or failure of a company.  I guess we have reached and passed that point on the cyber highway!
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