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Perimeter

12/24/2014
09:37 AM
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JPMorgan Hack: 2FA MIA In Breached Server

Sources close to the breach investigation say a network server missing two-factor authentication let attackers make their way into JPMorgan's servers.

It's not uncommon for cyber criminals or other attackers to hack their way to an organization's data via a forgotten machine sitting on the target's network, but you wouldn't expect that to happen at a major financial institution. That is apparently exactly what led attackers to infiltrate JPMorgan this year in a breach that escalated because the bank neglected to institute strong, two-factor authentication on one of its servers, according to a new report.

The New York Times reported this week that sources briefed on investigations into the cyberattack on JPMorgan last spring say the big hole that led attackers to the data was the lack of two-factor authentication of one of the bank's network servers. The attackers ultimately stole information on 83 million households and small businesses including email addresses, home addresses, and phone numbers.

Many details of the hack are not yet known publicly, but the initial attack started with the attackers grabbing the credentials of a JPMorgan employee, according to the new report. The lack of a second factor of authentication in one of the bank's network servers left the bank open to the data theft.

The initial attack vector has not been made public, but an obvious possibility would be a phishing email or some other common way to dupe the bank's users and get a foothold into the network. Once the bad guys can pose as a legitimate user, they attempt to move around the network and steal information under the radar.

"Until companies divorce the belief that users and accounts are the same thing, and begin monitoring account usage, vigilantly searching for compromised account usage, this trend of breaches will continue," says Trey Ford, global security strategist at Rapid7. "Once an attacker has a privileged credential, they can usually access sensitive data and escape most incident detection solutions because they appear as a valid user to those detection solutions."

The JPMorgan hackers were able to access more than 90 of the bank's servers, but were detected before they got to sensitive customer financial information, sources in the Times article said. The NSA is also assisting the bank in ensuring its network is more tightly locked down.

"These latest revelations underscore a difficult truth: It is effectively impossible to keep track of every possible hole in a modern network," says Steve Hulquist, chief evangelist at RedSeal. 

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

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Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2014 | 8:49:25 PM
J.P. Morgan and The Big Hole

"....the big hole that led attackers to the data was the lack of two-factor authentication of one of the bank's network servers."

 

What can you say about this ?   Seriously two-factor authentication ?!    This is simply blantant carelessness by admins and the Bank itself.  I am not about to let Chase off the hook for this in it's entirety, but looking at it from a micro-level it is clear ( to me at least) that someone was asleep at the wheel.  Taking their job for granted maybe ?  

Whatever the case, it does not speak well of Chase ( I am not sure anything could actually) nor does it speak well of their IT department.

I wonder if this is the same (IT) group that handles high frequency trading and the rest ?   If not get them on this issue - they have a proven track record of success.

Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2014 | 8:53:21 PM
J.P Morgan: Because We Said So.........

"...The JPMorgan hackers were able to access more than 90 of the bank's servers, but were detected before they got to sensitive customer financial information."

 

Chase really expects the public to believe this ?    Of course they do - they are Chase after all.   This is literally amazing, I believe the word is ludicrous.

Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2014 | 8:58:25 PM
The Real Issue of Data Breech and J.P. Morgan

Just what is Chase doing for those millions of customers whose data was compromised ?  (and an uncomfortable silence ensues).

 

I think I will just keep asking until I get an answer.  

Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2014 | 8:41:11 AM
So what?
80 million businesses email and address and phones are stolen? They did not have to steal that, we could have given them this induration. Some of these attacks are exaggerated by news channels and social media. Two factor authentication is not a solution for security problems, especially for JPMorgan.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2014 | 8:43:54 AM
Re: J.P. Morgan and The Big Hole
I agree. You can actually put two-factor on servers to decrease risk of exploits, but that being the solution for their hack is that realistic.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2014 | 8:46:30 AM
Re: J.P Morgan: Because We Said So.........
It may simply mean sensitive information such as account number, SSN and balance are kept in the rest of the severs but it is hard to believe those 90 servers do not have PII.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2014 | 8:49:25 AM
Re: The Real Issue of Data Breech and J.P. Morgan
I agree. This is the main problem. Attacks keep happening, we keep reporting but nothing happens to attackers and the ones who are responsible for allowing that. That is the biggest and most important loophole in security.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2014 | 8:56:32 PM
Re: So what?

"... Some of these attacks are exaggerated by news channels and social media."

 

@Dr, T     I agree.  A lot of these attacks are misunderstood banter on the Net.   But what really annoys me is that Chase apparently sat on this information for a long time.   Considering they should have released this news as soon as they were aware.   Enough with how the public is going to perceive you.  

I for one already know Chase is using "smoke and mirrors" when it comes to security.   They are doing no more than is required by law, and that apparently isn't enough.

So why did it take them so long to release this information ?   Only the nieve amongst us really believes Chase or any Net facing business is ever safe from a breech.

If Chase thinks we the public would think less of them because of this, well it has long since been too late for that.

Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2014 | 9:02:50 PM
Re: J.P. Morgan and The Big Hole

Dr.T      That is what I am saying, two-form factor authentication should have been a basic requirement.   This is a Bank not an online site selling t-shirts.   Someone ought to loose their job(s), but this Chase, where your account is more likely to be closed than any potential security hole. 

Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
12/29/2014 | 11:13:25 AM
Re: J.P. Morgan and The Big Hole
What's most disturbing here is that we look to financial institutions as the "gold standard" for security. If one of the biggest of these institutions didn't perform basic security best practices, we should be very, very worried about the other banks as well as other industries.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
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