Perimeter

9/30/2014
02:30 PM
John Klossner
John Klossner
Cartoon Contest
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Cartoon: End-User Security Prayer

John Klossner has been drawing technology cartoons for more than 15 years. His work regularly appears in Computerworld and Federal Computer Week. His illustrations and cartoons have also been published in The New Yorker, Barron's, and The Wall Street Journal. Web site: ... View Full Bio

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lharence
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lharence,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/8/2015 | 2:37:16 AM
Re: It's the password reset, stupid
The book Social Media by Shiv Singh (who we had on a show here in the past) has a great suggestion for how to create new passwords.
gcarter959
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gcarter959,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/16/2014 | 4:40:51 PM
It's the password reset, stupid
Great to have strong password.  But look carefully at how easy it is for somebody to reset your password - often so easy that cracking the password is a waste of time by comparison.
phoenix522
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phoenix522,
User Rank: Strategist
10/15/2014 | 3:42:28 PM
Re: Identity management solution?
I personally use Keepass with a pass phrase I simply will never forget. However, my password policy is based on the sensitivity of the data. Facebook has a 25 character alpha-numeric randomly generated password because I only use my Facebook app on my phone so I never have to use the password.

Each financial institution, bank, credit card, etc. gets its own unique password. Each bill, power, cable, etc. gets the same password but it is not used for any other account, everything else gets the same password that isn't tied to anything sensitive. In the end, I have to know maybe a half dozen passwords or so.

My other policy is around those questions. What was your first car? Your mothers maiden name, etc. I had the help desk howling because I use smart-assed answers. If you hack my Facebook or whatever, get information on me, knowing the answers to the security questions are much easier to figure out but if I went to "Some school", first car could have been something like a horse and buggy, etc. then your simply not going to figure it out...
Doux
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Doux,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/13/2014 | 9:30:10 PM
Re: PW ideas
After jumping through the hoops to reply to your response...here I go.  I don't find it difficult to have a pwd for every site I use, aamof, I feel too vulnerable if I do try and use a pwd twice.  I keep an encrypted list (app) that is cryptic in itself and I only know what the meaning of each line babble.  Anyway, I digress.  I would be interested in this DRR recording; is it available download to iPod?  

Years ago, a Lockheed-Martin worker told me that LM just reduced pwd logins from 20 to 10...and the end-users I supported (at the time) complained about two or three.  Currently, end-users I support can synch  a two-pwd login for in-house program use.

I did look up Cormac and am reading through his profile and the booklist.  Very curious about this reasoning and findings, esp in a recent report (Krebs) revealed the top ten most used passwords.  For the most part, people are not real cryptic with passwords anyway; when he or she should be, imho.  I consider creating passwords like a workout, if I'm not creative, they can become plateau and complacent, esp., if I do not use new phrases/nouns/verbs/etc to keep my pwd patterns not so easy to guess, like the weekly powerball drawing.  

 
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2014 | 7:58:13 PM
Re: Identity management solution?
So, ABC123!.? no good anymore? (kidding)
mce128
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mce128,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/7/2014 | 4:20:21 PM
Re: Identity management solution?
Honestly LastPass, KeePassX, et.al. are all very usable solutions to have extremely strong passwords everywhere that are different as well. Yes, you do have to remember the master password as it is used as the encryption key for the password store; however, you really should not use a password per se, but a passphrase. This way it is far more likely to be remembered and it is more secure as well. Dictionary attacks aren't going to be able to try every possible phrase out there, it's just infeasable. Use a phrase you will remember, a passage from a favorite book, an album title with its subtitle, a quote you like, etc... If it inculdes punctuation, be sure to include it (if you'll remember it anyway; if you don't think you will, then leave it out.) Also, you can include your own punctuation at the beginning, end or both. Just a ? or a ! at either or both ends adds a nice bit of difficulty.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/7/2014 | 2:34:03 PM
Re: PW ideas
Full disclosure: that's what happened to me when I tried a password manager. I forgot the password to the manager. 
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/6/2014 | 8:24:07 PM
Re: PW ideas
@Sara, yes, if I tried a different pw for every site, I would have to write them all down and then I'd surely lose the piece of paper. Or, to have to look at that piece of paper every time would take more time....
Sara Peters
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Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
10/6/2014 | 3:11:27 PM
Re: PW ideas
@soozyg  We spoke about that password-for-every-site policy last month on Dark Reading Radio, actually. And our guest, Cormac Herley from Microsoft Research, said that it's basically impossible to have a different password for every site, and not even advisable to try. I'm oversimplifying a bit, but it's worth giving a listen.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/6/2014 | 1:58:20 PM
Re: Identity management solution?
It is nice to see hackers walk away with a bag full of nothing, for a change.
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