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Perimeter

12/18/2018
09:00 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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8 Security Tips to Gift Your Loved Ones For the Holidays

Before the wrapping paper starts flying, here's some welcome cybersecurity advice to share with friends and family.
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OK, so you're sitting around the fireplace, eggnog in hand, the family's about to open presents, and your brother-in-law wants to know whether he really needs to do the security updates for his Microsoft apps.

Don't get angry – just ask him a few simple questions: Do you brush your teeth in the morning? Does your car need an oil change every 3,000 miles? Are there 24 hours in a day? With any luck he'll get your point.

Kelvin Coleman, the new executive director at the National Cyber Security Alliance, says society needs a change in security mindset.

"We need to change the culture so we get to the point that being smarter with passwords and doing the updates on computer applications are just things that people do naturally," Coleman says. "Everyone agrees that seat belts save lives and keep people safe. There's no difference with computers. It's like making sure the door on your house is locked before you leave for the day."

That's advice no one at your holiday gathering can dispute. And there's more for you to helpfully pass along, courtesy of Coleman, along with Patrick Sullivan, director of security strategy for Akamai, and John Pironti, president of IP Architects and an ISACA member. Their practical tips will provide a safe cyber experience for everyone over the holidays – and all year, too.  

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md.
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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
12/18/2018 | 11:30:48 AM
Public Hotspots
In the past 10 years technology has increased to the point where myfi is a very viable option. Where utilizing a myfi device through your phone carrier or using your phone as a personal hotspot or tether you can easily access the internet without connecting to an "untrusted" public hotspot. Data plan permitting I would recommend this option over connecting to wifi provided by airports or retail stores.
szurier210
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szurier210,
User Rank: Moderator
12/18/2018 | 10:34:25 PM
Re: Public Hotspots
Great point, yes myfi can work well instead of using airport wifi. Keep the good ideas coming everyone. I know I didn't think of everything. I think the main point is for people not to feel paralyzed, but on the other hand, know there's potential risk and the threat is real. Too many SMBs and private citizens unconnected with the computer industry still feel that the threat is overblown. That their small bank, insurance company or dentist's office in the Midwest or the South won't get hit. I think as corporate America gets better with security the attackers will prey on small businesses and private citzens. There's just such a reservoir of people and companies for them to hack. Some people will buy in to Cyber Hygiene, others won't. People may just have to learn the hard way. 
markgrogan
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markgrogan,
User Rank: Strategist
1/3/2019 | 10:35:17 PM
Nothing is impossible
Cyberattacks are becoming ever too common today so it is entirely up to us to protect our online activities as well as those of our loved ones. Sometimes we become nonchalant of our digital habits because we have never been cyberattacked before. However, we need to know that nothing is impossible and attackers do not choose their victims so just about anyone could fall prey.
StephenGiderson
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StephenGiderson,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2019 | 5:04:47 AM
Complicated Password storage
You know one thing that a lot of people take for granted, is how safe and secure their passwords really are. I'm sure that there has to be a better and safer way to generate and take care of so that it isn't easy for people to hack into all of that data that you have in storage! Sadly, it seems a bit too tedious to make use of an application to help you keep track of all of your passwords than it is to just come up with an easy password for yourself and that's where the security of your home systems fail...
bmichaud
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bmichaud,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/19/2018 | 9:16:44 AM
Thank you
Thank you and perfect Christmas Gift for loved ones. 
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