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Perimeter

3/6/2017
11:30 AM
Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney
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7 Hot Security Terms (and Buzzwords) to Know

How the security industry has a conversation with itself is constantly changing and the latest terms as well as buzzwords point us to where the technology is heading.
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Image Source: Flickr, courtesy of Gavin Llewellyn

Image Source: Flickr, courtesy of Gavin Llewellyn

It's tempting to dismiss buzzwords as slang-y, cliché, and overused (and they are … literally). But in the security industry, both buzzwords and the latest terms the industry has coined to describe a new technology or put a new spin on an old one also provide barometer-like clues of where the industry may be heading. What it's excited about. Or how it sorts the jaded veterans from the newbies. 

There were plenty of examples of the latest terms and buzzwords in full view at the RSA Conference in San Francisco last month. Here's a look at some of the more prolific ones seen and heard there; it's not an exhaustive list, so we're counting on you to help us embellish it. What did we forget? Please let us know in the Comments section.

 

Terry Sweeney is a Los Angeles-based writer and editor who has covered technology, networking, and security for more than 20 years. He was part of the team that started Dark Reading and has been a contributor to The Washington Post, Crain's New York Business, Red Herring, ... View Full Bio

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tcritchley07
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tcritchley07,
User Rank: Moderator
3/8/2017 | 3:30:56 PM
Re: Cyber Terms
No, just trying to get temrmnology straight in my mind in the context of security. Thanks. 
T Sweeney
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T Sweeney,
User Rank: Moderator
3/8/2017 | 1:29:02 PM
Re: Cyber Terms
Correct, @tcritchkley07... I used firewalls as just one example of compartmentalization. But the term could also apply to the bucketize slide or the micro-services slide as well, which both try to create similar boundaries in the name of better security.

Was there a specific application of compartmentalization you were thinking of?
tcritchley07
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tcritchley07,
User Rank: Moderator
3/8/2017 | 12:16:25 PM
Cyber Terms
Isn't compartmentalization the same as the more modern 'segmentation' of various entities, not just firewall traffic?
T Sweeney
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T Sweeney,
User Rank: Moderator
3/7/2017 | 1:55:44 PM
Re: To Buzzword #7 - Compartmentalization
Thanks, stormrunner2... what Fortinet's doing seems to track closely with this intelligent segmentation trend we're seeing from various vendors and startups.
storrmrunner2
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storrmrunner2,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/6/2017 | 7:13:32 PM
To Buzzword #7 - Compartmentalization
Have you looked at companies like Fortinet and ISFW (Internal Segmentation Firewall) solution?  They have been running at 100Gb speeds for a couple of years now.  And announced a 1Tb throughput firewall in Jan-2017 (https://www.fortinet.com/corporate/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/2017/the-worlds-first-terabit-firewall-appliance-ngfw.html).

Does this not solve the usability issue of mantaining LAN speeds with Layer-7 inspection services?
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