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Perimeter

12/26/2018
09:00 AM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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6 Ways to Anger Attackers on Your Network

Because you can't hack back without breaking the law, these tactics will frustrate, deceive, and annoy intruders instead.
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Honeypots

Companies used to make more use of honeypots, PCSU's Fredriksen says, but their popularity has since dropped off. "For quite a while, I had numerous honeypots out there that were interesting looking, and it was a way of frustrating attackers," he explains.

While adversaries are "going down the rabbit hole" and infiltrating the organization, honeypots let you collect information on who they are and what they're looking for. If they're seeking to do a "low and slow attack," he explains, or hiding themselves so it's six months before you find them on your network, it takes work, dedication, sharing, and discussion to track and monitor them. A honeypot lets security pros learn more about attackers while they operate.

However, they require time to build and monitor, and companies often don't have the resources they need to do that, he adds. Cylance's Portvliet says he rarely sees companies use honeypots in the wild. "From my perspective, it's not a widely used technique for defense," he adds.

UnitedLex's Straight cautions companies as they explore honeypots: An attacker could see them as a challenge, he says, and things could escalate in a way they may otherwise not have.

(Image: Studio KIVI stock.adobe.com)

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ricardo.arroyo@watchguard.com
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50%
[email protected],
User Rank: Author
1/4/2019 | 7:19:51 PM
Re: Canaries
As with everything else there are some companies that provide the alerting infrastructure and send you an email. A quick google search will result in a few companies that provide a managed service.
samwebstudio
0%
100%
samwebstudio,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/4/2019 | 6:46:22 AM
Re: Hack back
nice
MarkSitkowski
100%
0%
MarkSitkowski,
User Rank: Moderator
1/3/2019 | 5:53:39 PM
Re: Hack back
There's a very simple and effective way to strike back, which will not violate any laws, and earn you some gratitude.

As you rightly pointed out, hackers don't use their own hardware, they use compromised machines, usually high-end servers.

The thing to do, as soon as you detect a hack attempt is:

Add a firewall rule blocking the IP address

Look up the owner of the IP in whois

Send your log extract, which shows the hack attempt, to the owner's abuse contact, and CC the country's CERT office

In all cases, the owner will either remove the malware/script or cancel the account generating the traffic. ISP's hate hackers nearly as much as you do, and you'll get cooperation from  every country in the world.

The most satidfying message we received was from a Russian ISP, saying "This user has been terminated..."

We've been doing this for years and, to-date, have seen 102195 sources of hacking removed from the internet.

Do it. It works.

 
Joe Stanganelli
100%
0%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/29/2018 | 6:29:02 PM
A couple of points
The note about sharing information and working together is well taken. The financial-services sector has been doing this and scaling up their resources here for some years now -- with assistance/collaboration w/ government agencies as well (the latter of which see it as a matter of crime deterrence and national security).

The separate point about "non-prosecutable activity" is similarly well-taken. While I could never advise it as an attorney, risk and compliance professionals need to understand that security is about risk. Sometimes, non-compliance -- while unlawful and unrecommended by the attorneys -- is an effective business tactic.
Joe Stanganelli
100%
0%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/29/2018 | 6:23:00 PM
Re: Open-ports
@Dr.T: Of course, in some cases, accessibility trumps security. The key is looking at which ports are open and which ports are being accessed. Some ports have almost no business being accessed by unknown third parties ever.
idolapk
0%
100%
idolapk,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/29/2018 | 2:51:01 PM
Re: Hack back
very nice
Dr.T
100%
0%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:26:39 AM
Open-ports
If you have an open port on your machine, for example, many people know you have a weakness. Open ports are the same as least privileged approach, closed unless needed.
Dr.T
100%
0%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:21:42 AM
Canaries
Canaries are less invasive and less passive, and it's less likely even an advanced attacker will realize what happened. I assume it still requires to set it up and monitor, do some resources are needed.
Dr.T
100%
0%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:19:38 AM
Honeypots
However, they require time to build and monitor, and companies often don't have the resources they need to do that Honeypots are good, it requires resources obviously, you can use that resource to harden you production env.
Dr.T
100%
0%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:17:45 AM
privileges
Don't give people more privileges than they really need. I think this is important aspect of whole security, and always missed use of least privilege rule.
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