Partner Perspectives  Connecting marketers to our tech communities.
5/4/2015
01:25 PM
Lorie Wigle
Lorie Wigle
Partner Perspectives
50%
50%

Defenses Outside the Wall

Protecting the Internet of Things means protecting the privacy of customers and colleagues.

Most of the devices in the Internet of Things (IoT) reside outside of your security wall. Some, such as mobile point-of-sale terminals and other publicly accessible devices, are outside because they could be a gateway for malicious attacks. Others, such as sensors and remote monitors, may be too distant to include inside. And some, such as medical devices and other specialized tools, may be outside of IT’s sphere. However, all of these devices still need to be protected as they go about their tasks of collecting and communicating sensitive and valuable personal data.

Protecting the Internet of Things is not like protecting a data center. The devices are small, often publicly accessible and vulnerable, and have limited computing power. As we saw in recent security breaches, keeping some devices inside the firewall is not recommended. The devices themselves need to be hardened to withstand attacks and resist tampering, but without compromising front-line performance and battery life or increasing operating costs. By building the necessary security functions into silicon, IoT technology such as point-of-sale devices and self-serve kiosks can control their integrity from the factory.

Retailers must vigilantly secure the valuable information they hold. It is important for consumers to know that companies are working to protect their financial information from cyberthreats by deploying security deep into their retail systems. As connected retail continues to grow, directly addressing security challenges will be an important part of brand reputation and success. Antivirus, immutable identity, dynamic whitelisting, applications control, and secure boot are mandatory functions to defend the millions of connected point-of-sale and kiosk devices around the world regularly targeted by hackers. These tools provide immediate protection from zero-day vulnerabilities and unauthorized application changes, while reducing the frequency of software patches.

Secure Communications

With little or no local storage, IoT devices are heavily dependent on communications, so securing the communications path is as important as hardening the device. Having your credit card information stolen is annoying and potentially costly. Having your healthcare information stolen can be personally embarrassing, have long-term effects, and provide hackers with everything they need for identity theft.

As the IoT moves further and further into healthcare, medical devices are coming under attack because of the valuable information they contain. Standard security does not protect against insider attacks, staff errors, security lapses, or theft of data in transit. Adding powerful data encryption to healthcare devices protects confidential patient data in transit and at rest. As a side benefit, encryption can also monitor and control access to the systems and their data, sending alarms in the event of unauthorized attempts to access them. Even more than consumers, patients place a high value on trust and privacy. Security breaches or leaks of confidential healthcare data could be harmful or fatal.

Securing the IoT -- whether in retail, healthcare, industrial, or home environments -- means looking at the whole ecosystem, not individual points and devices, from silicon to software and from platforms to management. Industry specialists must be able to incorporate these tools into their unique solutions, addressing the specific needs of their target markets. Best practices demand that we not only harden the devices, but also secure the communications and monitor and manage the security state.  Most important, we need to remember that by protecting the data, we are protecting the privacy of our customers, colleagues, neighbors, friends, and families. 

Lorie Wigle is building a new business focused on securing critical infrastructure and IOT more broadly at Intel subsidiary McAfee. Lorie has been with Intel for nearly 30 years in a wide variety of marketing and technical roles. She has an MBA from Portland State University ... View Full Bio
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Christian Bryant
50%
50%
Christian Bryant,
User Rank: Ninja
5/6/2015 | 5:06:04 PM
Re: Grok Your Org's Ecosystem
Lori,

Since 2013 I've been curiously watching for a formal documentation set from the Security Fabric Program.  Is that what you are referring to?  I first heard of that initiative when reading up on smart grid security.

Cheers.
LoriWigle
50%
50%
LoriWigle,
User Rank: Strategist
5/6/2015 | 3:36:09 PM
Re: Grok Your Org's Ecosystem

Good points about not just lone cybercriminals vs. datacenters, but the value of encryption especially for portable/moveable devices, remembering low-tech physical security and especially maintaining a holistic situational awareness of the systems security state in design and operation. We are working hard to bring Intel Security technology and the McAfee infrastructure to bear on IoT and I'm confident with the help of professionals like yourself we'll be able to make security a foundational element.

Ilya Geller
50%
50%
Ilya Geller,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2015 | 10:41:42 AM
The Era of Absolute Privacy is coming! No need in cookies or browsing history anymore.
The Era of Absolute Privacy is coming! No need in cookies or browsing history anymore.
I discovered and patented how to structure any data: Language has its own Internal parsing, indexing and statistics. For instance, there are two sentences:
a) 'Fire!'
b) 'Dismay and anguish were depicted on every countenance; the males turned pale, and the females fainted; Mr. Snodgrass and Mr. Winkle grasped each other by the hand, and gazed at the spot where their leader had gone down, with frenzied eagerness; while Mr. Tupman, by way of rendering the promptest assistance, and at the same time conveying to any persons who might be within hearing, the clearest possible notion of the catastrophe, ran off across the country at his utmost speed, screaming 'Fire!' with all his might.'
Evidently, that the phrase 'Fire!' has different importance into both sentences, in regard to extra information in both. This distinction is reflected as the phrase weights: the first has 1, the second – 0.02; the greater weight signifies stronger emotional 'acuteness'.
First you need to parse obtaining phrases from clauses, for sentences and paragraphs.
Next, you calculate Internal statistics, weights; where the weight refers to the frequency that a phrase occurs in relation to other phrases.
After that data is indexed by common dictionary, like Webster, and annotated by subtexts.
This is a small sample of the structured data:
this - signify - <> : 333333
both - are - once : 333333
confusion - signify - <> : 333321
speaking - done - once : 333112
speaking - was - both : 333109
place - is - in : 250000
To see the validity of technology - pick up any sentence.

Do you have a pencil?

All other technologies depend on spying, on quires, on SQL, all of them, finding statistics. See IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, Google and Yahoo? Apache Hadoop and NoSQL? My technology is the only one that obtains statistics from texts themselves.
Being structured information will search for users based on their profiles of structured data. Each and every user can get only specifically tailored for him information: there is no any privacy issue, nobody ever will know what the user got and read.
My technology exploits the Laws of Nature, which determine the inner construction of all Languages: I came from Analytic Philosophy, from Internal Relations Theory.

There is no sense to waste money spying on Internet anymore! For what? No commercial purpose.
Christian Bryant
50%
50%
Christian Bryant,
User Rank: Ninja
5/4/2015 | 4:20:31 PM
Grok Your Org's Ecosystem
There is this strange outlook by some that InfoSec deals only with datacenters and desktops, and that the lonely hooded cybercriminal working from a dirty basement is the archetype.  Nothing could be further from the truth. 

The power of encryption cannot be over-emphasized, especially in light of all the points you make regarding the wide variety of devices out there, some part of the "inner circle", some outside of the that spider web of firewalls.  Especially in the healthcare setting, devices roll around, stay with patients, are exposed to the public every day and some are potential pipelines to bigger and more relevant data to criminal elements looking for a way in.  Layer upon layer of encryption from the hard drives, to the operating system, to the applications and then the channels those apps talk on - all encrypted, all using different types of keys.  This could save your butt the day that one device "walks" off somewhere, and it was the device that had connections back to the database, or some other form entry to the coveted inner circle. 

LowTech security is also an option, in case InfoSec architects forget that locks, strategic placement of high-risk movable devices, and patrolling sets of eyes on critical data items are all part of the job, too.  Not everything can be secured through encryption and firewalls. 

I think being able to see the whole infrastructure, picture the entire ecosystem of data from hardcopy (ugh) to digital should be the goal of every InfoSec engineer; knowing all your interfaces, inputs and outputs and the state of data at any given step in the workflow makes for better implemented security for that data.
aziza bond
50%
50%
aziza bond,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2015 | 2:03:42 PM
privacy over the internet
Hi madam Lorie Wigle


I really understand your concern about privacy and all the things that happens because of the lack of privacy and sexurity in the Internet , but we as humans we are a social being, we need to live with others, we need to share our thoughts with other humans, so it is gonna be a big problem also if there is a 100% privacy in internet

thanks for the post madam
Printers: The Weak Link in Enterprise Security
Kelly Sheridan, Associate Editor, Dark Reading,  10/16/2017
20 Questions to Ask Yourself before Giving a Security Conference Talk
Joshua Goldfarb, Co-founder & Chief Product Officer, IDDRA,  10/16/2017
Why Security Leaders Can't Afford to Be Just 'Left-Brained'
Bill Bradley, SVP, Cyber Engineering and Technical Services, CenturyLink,  10/17/2017
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Partner Perspectives
What's This?
In a digital world inundated with advanced security threats, Intel Security seeks to transform how we live and work to keep our information secure. Through hardware and software development, Intel Security delivers robust solutions that integrate security into every layer of every digital device. In combining the security expertise of McAfee with the innovation, performance, and trust of Intel, this vision becomes a reality.

As we rely on technology to enhance our everyday and business life, we must too consider the security of the intellectual property and confidential data that is housed on these devices. As we increase the number of devices we use, we increase the number of gateways and opportunity for security threats. Intel Security takes the “security connected” approach to ensure that every device is secure, and that all security solutions are seamlessly integrated.
Featured Writers
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Security Vulnerabilities: The Next Wave
Just when you thought it was safe, researchers have unveiled a new round of IT security flaws. Is your enterprise ready?
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.