Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

News & Commentary

2/12/2015
05:00 PM
Alexandra Gheorghe
Alexandra Gheorghe
Partner Perspectives
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
100%
0%

Five Techniques to Keep Employees’ Computing Secure

With BYOD on the rise, these tips can help IT staff mitigate security risks, from mobile devices to data centers.

There is never too much security in place when it comes to a company’s data center, employees, and clients. US companies have embraced the Bring-Your-Own-Device trend, and this movement continues to gain traction in 2015.

Research firm Gartner predicts that by 2017, half of employers will ask their employees to bring their own device for work. As enterprise BYOD programs continue to become more commonplace, 38% of companies expect to stop providing devices to workers by 2016, according to a global survey of CIOs conducted by the firm.

As ecommerce and mobile commerce continue to grow across the US, the world’s largest economy experiences more than half of all global payment card fraud (51%, according to Business Insider), with a cost of $7.1 billion in 2013, according to Javelin Strategy & Research. What’s more, with each holiday or event and the high rate of mobile phone penetration, online and mobile fraud becomes more prevalent, making the country a perfect target for cybercrime.

Not surprisingly, every two seconds, another American becomes a victim of identity fraud.

By maintaining security control through better end-point management, IT staff can help mitigate security risks from mobile devices to data centers. At the same time, US companies gain happier and more efficient employees.

CIOs just have to find the perfect combination of tools and use them wisely. Here are five techniques to begin with:

  • IT staff should start with performing an initial security audit to see the existing holes and define the likely threats. The insider threat is the greatest, proportionally, followed closely by social engineering, so they should train staff in good security practices
  • As paranoid as it sounds, IT departments should also consider thorough employee background checks. Most attacks start with a single person that opened the wrong e-mail attachment. CIOs should also have in mind the termination of employment relationships and the consequent transfers of company data hosted on personal devices.
  • Remember to add firewall protections, too. Securing all devices will also increase malware awareness, making employees more conscious of online dangers, even when they navigate on the Internet on the go or at home.
  • Carry out regular security updates on all software and devices, and implement a password policy that everybody respects (minimum eight characters, unique and complex, regularly changed).
  • When it comes to the tools IT staff may use, a security management solution is not an option, but a necessity. All IT departments should install and update a certified security solution that will consolidate control for virtualized, physical, and mobile endpoints.

Besides advanced persistent threats and DDoS attacks, improper security measures are the weak links that can take a company offline both in terms of reputation and profit. IT consumerization and BYOD trends should make CIOs reassess what their enterprise security strategy means.

Companies shouldn’t stop allowing employee-owned devices, but they shouldn’t be too permissive either. A clear policy for email, Internet, and mobile devices will make employees’ computing secure, and everybody happy.

Alexandra fulfills the Security Specialist role for Bitdefender, performing writing duties such as security news for Bitdefender's security blog, as well as marketing and PR materials. She started writing about online security at the dawn of the decade - after 3-years in ... View Full Bio
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
Data breaches and regulations have forced organizations to pay closer attention to the security incident response function. However, security leaders may be overestimating their ability to detect and respond to security incidents. Read this report to find out more.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-17230
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
includes/theme-functions.php in the OneTone theme through 3.0.6 for WordPress allows unauthenticated options changes.
CVE-2019-17231
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
includes/theme-functions.php in the OneTone theme through 3.0.6 for WordPress has multiple stored XSS issues.
CVE-2020-10689
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
A flaw was found in the Eclipse Che up to version 7.8.x, where it did not properly restrict access to workspace pods. An authenticated user can exploit this flaw to bypass JWT proxy and gain access to the workspace pods of another user. Successful exploitation requires knowledge of the service name ...
CVE-2020-10960
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
In MediaWiki before 1.34.1, users can add various Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) classes (which can affect what content is shown or hidden in the user interface) to arbitrary DOM nodes via HTML content within a MediaWiki page. This occurs because jquery.makeCollapsible allows applying an event handler...
CVE-2020-11500
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-03
Zoom Client for Meetings through 4.6.9 uses the ECB mode of AES for video and audio encryption. Within a meeting, all participants use a single 128-bit key.