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9/26/2016
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State Of The Exploit Kit

Exploit kit traffic is down considerably following the demise of Nuclear and Angler, but many researchers see it only as a temporary disruption.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock

Image Source: Adobe Stock

Turnkey exploit kits -- built in with malware infection mechanisms and distribution channels, command and control infrastructure, and everything a cybercriminal would need to attack users for the sake of data theft and other nefarious purposes -- have long been the bane of the cybersecurity landscape.

These kits put cutting-edge technical capabilities at the fingertips of crooks with very little geek cred but open pocketbooks, broadening the possibilities of wide-scale infection for profit.

On the good-news front, exploit kits have seen a massive slowdown in 2016. However, on the not-so-good-news front, many researchers believe that it is only a matter of time before the criminals pick up the pace again.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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