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11/2/2016
10:00 AM
Todd Thibodeaux
Todd Thibodeaux
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It's Time To Address The Cybersecurity Gender Gap Before It's Too Late

It will take years to substantively raise the percentage of women in cybersecurity, so the tech industry better start working at it now.

It's well known that women are underrepresented in technology roles. While women make up 47% of the workforce, only 34% of tech industry professionals are women. Within the cybersecurity sector, the numbers are even worse. Only 10% of IT security workers are women, contributing to a projected 1.5 million unfilled positions within the industry by 2020.

While it's unfeasible to completely close the cybersecurity gender gap within three years, this should serve as a wake-up call for educators and employers to more seriously address the dearth of women in cybersecurity and technology more broadly.

Image Source: CompTia 'Make Tech Her Story'
Image Source: CompTia 'Make Tech Her Story'

The Costs of Gender Imbalance
Women's dramatic underrepresentation in the cybersecurity sector isn't just bad optics, it's a shortcoming that will continue to undermine the industry. Data breaches are projected to cost businesses $2.1 trillion by 2019, but organizations will be ill-equipped to manage the aftermath of these incidents if they're unable to recruit and retain the cybersecurity talent they need. With an almost exclusively male workforce, it's evident that the cybersecurity sector needs to seek out new avenues of growth. Increasing women's presence in the cybersecurity industry would largely fill the gap.

Even if women only reached representational parity with the IT industry at large — making up 34% of the cybersecurity workforce without replacing existing professionals — women would more than fill the projected employee deficit. When nearly half the population represents an untapped source of expertise, employers need to reassess how they attract and train cybersecurity professionals.

Break the Tech Stigma Early
The cybersecurity sector faces many of the same challenges as the tech industry at large: women largely self-select out of IT occupations at a young age. Twenty-seven percent of middle-school girls have considered an IT career, but this number drops to only 18% by the time they reach high school, according to a new CompTIA campaign.

While businesses and schools have traditionally addressed this challenge with tech education programs, they're far from a silver bullet. Girls who have taken a tech class are slightly more likely to consider a tech career than girls on average (32% compared to 23%, respectively), but on its own, changing the curriculum isn't enough. 

Knowing someone in the industry is a much more effective predictor of interest in a future career. Only 37% of girls know someone with a job in the tech industry, but 60% of those who do have considered an IT career. Similarly, the most commonly cited reason for not pursuing tech is a lack of information about what these jobs involve (69%), which is easily addressed with access to a guardian or mentor with industry experience.

Industry Ambassadors
Organizations face stiff challenges to attracting women to cybersecurity, but thankfully they already have the resources they need to improve their situation.

Women currently working in the sector can provide valuable guidance, acting as mentors to the next generation of potential cybersecurity workers. Cybersecurity professionals such as Google's Parisa Tabriz and Katie Moussouris (who helped launch Microsoft's bug bounty program) can help promote a healthy image of women thriving in the sector, reshaping public perception of what a security expert looks like.

Of course, it's not enough to focus exclusively on young women. Retraining opportunities allow women already in the workforce the opportunity to transition to a cybersecurity role. Especially as business process evolution and innovation continue to accelerate, employer emphasis is shifting from extended periods of occupation-specific preparation to more agile certification-based training. Businesses should support employees through cybersecurity training and certification programs to ensure that they're attracting women from a variety of educational backgrounds, not just those who specialized in information security in college.

Gender Parity
It will take time before the cybersecurity sector can attract more women to fill its ranks. Moving forward, organizations must more actively recruit women, especially amid security threats of growing severity and cost.

Reaching gender parity will take concerted effort from both businesses and educators, but an approach focusing on mentorship and continual training can help bridge the gap. By committing to a more inclusive workforce, employers can encourage more women to pursue careers as cybersecurity professionals.

Related Content:

Black Hat Europe 2016 is coming to London's Business Design Centre November 1 through 4. Click for information on the briefing schedule and to register.

Todd Thibodeaux is the president and chief executive officer of the Computing Technology Industry Association, the leading trade association representing the business interests of the global information technology industry. He is responsible for leading strategy, development ... View Full Bio
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banasidhe
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banasidhe,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2016 | 2:05:15 AM
Edit requested
FTFY

 

Women currently working in the sector can provide valuable guidance, acting as mentors to the next generation of potential cybersecurity workers. Cybersecurity professionals such as Google's Parisa Tabriz and Katie Moussouris (who helped launched Microsoft's bug bounty program) can help promote a healthy image of women thriving in the sector, reshaping public perception of what a security expert looks like.
DavidA833
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DavidA833,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2016 | 7:46:56 AM
Re: Gebder Bias
Is this even a serious post?  We have barely a soul in the cybersecurity inductry, and the person is screaming gender biased?  Give the industry a chance to even start before you start decrying its failures.

You must have al daughters - or your wife is mad at you.
misty0219
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misty0219,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/8/2016 | 12:34:31 PM
Re: Edit requested
I couldn't agree more. I'm currently in the process of focusing much more on cybersecurity and it's not a walk in the park without guidance. Luckily, I'm used to the struggle of being a woman in the field so it's tolerable. Finding a female mentor is challenging and, while I hate to say it, I've had more support from the males throughout my whole career. The very simple fact of the matter is, the women that are in the roles to offer guidance usually don't. Change starts with other women in the field and nobody else. 
rstoney
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rstoney,
User Rank: Strategist
11/3/2016 | 9:26:15 AM
Qualified people > Gender Gap
My work in the IT Security field is more focused on the technical aspects.  As such I tend to care not a bit about your gender.  As a co-worker - I care about the quality of your work and your knowledge.

If you are better than I - I will learn from you

If you are about equal - we can learn from each other

If I am better than you - I will teach you.

I don't care if you are male/female.  It won't matter to me if you color your hair chartreuse. (although I will tease you about it) I don't care about your age.  

 

This "gender gap" worry is inane.  I am dramatically more concerned with "skilled people"   As should you be.
BrooklynNellie2
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BrooklynNellie2,
User Rank: Strategist
11/4/2016 | 9:34:17 AM
Are Women Smarter?
As evidenced by their avoidance of this boring and thankless job, I have to conclude that the answer is "yes".
lorraine89
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lorraine89,
User Rank: Ninja
11/9/2016 | 9:09:21 AM
Cyber security
Cyber security is something so important and yet it has been totally ignored and neglected by the millennials and all. It is important to start securing our IP addresses from possible data hacks or IP tracking services. I use PureVPN US server to anonymize my IP address and to securely browse the web without anyone snooping me around. 

https://www.purevpn.com 
lorraine89
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lorraine89,
User Rank: Ninja
11/9/2016 | 9:09:46 AM
Cyber security
Cyber security is something so important and yet it has been totally ignored and neglected by the millennials and all. It is important to start securing our IP addresses from possible data hacks or IP tracking services. I use PureVPN US server to anonymize my IP address and to securely browse the web without anyone snooping me around. 

https://www.purevpn.com 
kasstri
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kasstri,
User Rank: Strategist
11/10/2016 | 7:24:03 AM
Thanks
Good post! Your site raising my mood every time! Thanks
Benefiter
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Benefiter,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/11/2016 | 12:00:49 PM
dodatkowy zarobek
Thank you, I've been seeking for info about this subject matter for ages and yours is the best I have discovered so far.
Benefiter
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50%
Benefiter,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/12/2016 | 10:14:23 AM
Re: dodatkowy zarobek
It's actually a cool and useful piece of information. I am glad that you shared this helpful information with us. Please keep us informed like this. Thank you for sharing.
Benefiter
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50%
Benefiter,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2016 | 10:02:40 AM
dodatkowy zarobek praca w niemczech
Thank you, I've been seeking for info about this subject matter for ages and yours is the best I have discovered so far.
Lily652
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Lily652,
User Rank: Moderator
11/12/2016 | 5:07:04 AM
prayer times

Thank you for this incredible information. It was very useful for me, I ll be looking forward your new posts. 

Lily652
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50%
Lily652,
User Rank: Moderator
11/12/2016 | 5:07:33 AM
prayer times

Thank you for this incredible information. It was very useful for me, I ll be looking forward your new posts. 

Lily652
50%
50%
Lily652,
User Rank: Moderator
11/12/2016 | 5:07:51 AM
prayer times

Thank you for this incredible information. It was very useful for me, I ll be looking forward your new posts. 

Benefiter
50%
50%
Benefiter,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/12/2016 | 10:09:28 AM
Re:
It is difficult to say exactly what the author tried to say, but i liked it. Good post! But if u want more information read another one
syntax_attack
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syntax_attack,
User Rank: Strategist
11/14/2016 | 9:48:25 AM
This is nonsense
Oh no, there isn't an exact demographic representation in an industry?!?!  RACISM!! SEXISM!!

 

This is nonsense, pure and simple.  I just want the most qualified individuals for the position, and those who are going to enjoy working in the field.  I don't care if this means 90% of nurses are women or 90% of IT professionals are men.  The truth of the matter is men and women are different, we generally enjoy different things.  Men are on average more drawn towards STEM fields, and women are more drawn to fields with personal interaction.  There is nothing wrong with this and trying to force parity when it wouldn't naturally arise is just a recipe for pushing less competent people into positions they will probably be unhappy in.  Furthermore, until people are pushing for gender parity in the dangerous, dirty, labor-intensive and generally less-coveted jobs that men currently dominate these cries for "gender parity" will seem as disingenuous as they are when the hypocrisy is laid bare.
kasstri
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kasstri,
User Rank: Strategist
11/29/2016 | 12:23:18 PM
Re: keydown
Is this even a serious post?  We have barely a soul in the cybersecurity inductry, and the person is screaming gender biased?  Give the industry a chance to even start before you start decrying its failures.
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