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Identity & Access Management

9/11/2014
10:30 AM
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Google: No Breach In Latest Online Dump Of Credentials

The online leak of some 5 million username and password combinations consisted of mostly stale or older credentials that don't actually work, Google says.

Speculation was high yesterday in the wake of a Russian news outlet's report that some 5 million Google usernames and passwords had been "doxed" or dumped online for all to see.

Google set the record straight late yesterday that no breach of Google systems had occurred and most of the dumped credentials were stale: less than 2% of the credentials actually work. The search engine giant says its automated anti-hijacking systems would have blocked any attempts to use any working stolen credentials.

"One of the unfortunate realities of the Internet today is a phenomenon known in security circles as 'credential dumps' -- the posting of lists of usernames and passwords on the web. We’re always monitoring for these dumps so we can respond quickly to protect our users," Google said in a blog post.

Google reiterated what most security experts already had inferred: that the stolen usernames and passwords were not the result of a Google breach, but instead due to everything from credential reuse on the web to possible malware and phishing attacks.

"For instance, if you reuse the same username and password across websites, and one of those websites gets hacked, your credentials could be used to log into the others. Or attackers can use malware or phishing schemes to capture login credentials," Google said.

Google recommends users adopt its two-factor authentication option, as well as create a strong and unique password.  

Said David Hobbs, director of security solutions at Radware, businesses and consumers should now expect their personal information to be leaked at some point. "Users need to keep in mind that the best defense is a good offense -- minimize your vulnerability by thinking twice about what data is placed in the cloud," Hobbs says. "Also, the standard best practices hold true: stop using the same passwords across multiple online services, and create a rotation plan for regularly changing passwords."

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

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Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
9/17/2014 | 9:47:29 AM
Re: a realistic statement
I agree, in today's world there is no way to 100% insulate yourself from a breach.  Well, unless you deal only in cash, don't go to the doctor, dentist or do business with anyone who needs to know your name.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
9/12/2014 | 6:27:30 AM
Re: a realistic statement
Agreed. We've been saying this about businesses for some time now, but it's also true for consumers. So it's a wise and realistic perspective for consumers to adopt as well. 
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2014 | 9:29:07 PM
a realistic statement
Said David Hobbs, director of security solutions at Radware, businesses and consumers should now expect their personal information to be leaked at some point

I like this statement! Because no program, no coding is ever truly safe, someone's always going to try to get in. So, people should just calm down about it...we should EXPECT our information to be breached, not surprised. Great quotation.
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