Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Operations

6/7/2016
11:30 AM
Sean Martin
Sean Martin
Slideshows
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail

How To Prepare For A Data Breach

These five from-the-trenches strategies will help you win the fight against today's sophisticated, conniving attackers.
2 of 6

Have an Incident Response (IR) plan in place and test it regularly

'I can't stress this enough,' says Grillo. 'Organizations must have an incident response plan, exercise it against two to three likely attack vectors, and see how well the company reacts.' 

- All organizations, regardless of size, should have an IR plan where you clearly define how to respond when a potential breach is identified, or when an actual attack occurs -- including who needs to be involved from a notification and decision-making perspective.
- Be prepared to respond at your very best in a real breach scenario by conducting simulation exercises for different types of breaches that could affect your organization, possibly including these scenarios: 

- Advanced Threats
- Cybercrime
- Fraud
- Malicious Insider
- Careless Insider


- Extend your plan and simulation exercises beyond the IT staff. Ensure that every member of the IR team knows exactly what their roles are and has a good understanding of the time commitment involved when an incident does occur. The IR team should include key stakeholders from all applicable areas of the organization, such as: 

- Legal
- HR
- Executive Management
- PR / Communications
- Information Technology


- Have a plan that includes your third-party vendors, so you can manage their risk from the beginning of the relationship. For example, your vendors should have a service level agreement (SLA) in their contract that governs their responses to security incidents. Get a clear view into those requirements, and determine where liability rests if a third-party vendor exposes your data.



More Reading | Lack of Third-Party Risk Reporting: http://www.dfs.ny.gov/about/press/pr1504091.htm

Image Source: imsmartin

Have an Incident Response (IR) plan in place and test it regularly

I cant stress this enough, says Grillo. Organizations must have an incident response plan, exercise it against two to three likely attack vectors, and see how well the company reacts.

  • All organizations, regardless of size, should have an IR plan where you clearly define how to respond when a potential breach is identified, or when an actual attack occurs -- including who needs to be involved from a notification and decision-making perspective.
  • Be prepared to respond at your very best in a real breach scenario by conducting simulation exercises for different types of breaches that could affect your organization, possibly including these scenarios:
    • Advanced Threats
    • Cybercrime
    • Fraud
    • Malicious Insider
    • Careless Insider
  • Extend your plan and simulation exercises beyond the IT staff. Ensure that every member of the IR team knows exactly what their roles are and has a good understanding of the time commitment involved when an incident does occur. The IR team should include key stakeholders from all applicable areas of the organization, such as:
    • Legal
    • HR
    • Executive Management
    • PR / Communications
    • Information Technology
  • Have a plan that includes your third-party vendors, so you can manage their risk from the beginning of the relationship. For example, your vendors should have a service level agreement (SLA) in their contract that governs their responses to security incidents. Get a clear view into those requirements, and determine where liability rests if a third-party vendor exposes your data.

More Reading | Lack of Third-Party Risk Reporting: http://www.dfs.ny.gov/about/press/pr1504091.htm

Image Source: imsmartin

2 of 6
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Microsoft Patches Wormable RCE Vulns in Remote Desktop Services
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/13/2019
The Mainframe Is Seeing a Resurgence. Is Security Keeping Pace?
Ray Overby, Co-Founder & President at Key Resources, Inc.,  8/15/2019
GitHub Named in Capital One Breach Lawsuit
Dark Reading Staff 8/14/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-15150
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
In the OAuth2 Client extension before 0.4 for MediaWiki, a CSRF vulnerability exists due to the OAuth2 state parameter not being checked in the callback function.
CVE-2017-18550
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
An issue was discovered in drivers/scsi/aacraid/commctrl.c in the Linux kernel before 4.13. There is potential exposure of kernel stack memory because aac_get_hba_info does not initialize the hbainfo structure.
CVE-2017-18551
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
An issue was discovered in drivers/i2c/i2c-core-smbus.c in the Linux kernel before 4.14.15. There is an out of bounds write in the function i2c_smbus_xfer_emulated.
CVE-2017-18552
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
An issue was discovered in net/rds/af_rds.c in the Linux kernel before 4.11. There is an out of bounds write and read in the function rds_recv_track_latency.
CVE-2018-20976
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-19
An issue was discovered in fs/xfs/xfs_super.c in the Linux kernel before 4.18. A use after free exists, related to xfs_fs_fill_super failure.