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6/5/2016
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How Risky Is Bleeding Edge Tech?

Experts with the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute rate 10 up-and-coming technologies for risk.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock

Image Source: Adobe Stock

Most seasoned information security experts know that when a new technology starts taking off like wildfire, chances are pretty good that someone's going to get burned. The curve of innovation for decades has generally traversed a path where engineers think of features, bells and whistles first, security last.

As a new crop of exciting technology like smart medical devices, drones and driverless cars jockeys for position in the mainstream, the question is how much risk they'll bring to the table. A panel of experts with the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute recently took a look at some of the hottest tech making its way to the forefront to answer this very question. Here are some of the highlights from the report, 2016 Emerging Technology Domains Risk Survey.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
6/6/2016 | 7:45:38 AM
VR
When it came to choosing which VR headset I would buy earlier this year, I went over and over in my head with all the different pros and cons.

While the Vive seemed like the Superior headset, I was worried about HTC's potential financial difficulties. 

Admittedly in the end I got both and will now sell my Rift on, but I do still wonder how quickly VR is going to catch on. I think it might take a couple of years, at which point the Vive will be oudated, but by then hopefully we'll be looking at second generation devices.
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