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Careers & People

9/14/2015
10:30 AM
John Klossner
John Klossner
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Comic Con, Dark Reading Version

Our graphic novel illustrating a typical day in the life of a security super hero, as imagined by cartoonist John Klossner.
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Whether you see yourself as Peter Quill or Gamora, it’s not easy doing daily battle as a guardian of your galaxy -- be it a corporation, goverment organization, datacenter, or small business. When duty calls, you answer.

 

 

John Klossner has been drawing technology cartoons for more than 15 years. His work regularly appears in Computerworld and Federal Computer Week. His illustrations and cartoons have also been published in The New Yorker, Barron's, and The Wall Street Journal. Web site: ...
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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/14/2015 | 12:36:15 PM
#2
#2 is pretty hilarious and also makes me wonder if password strength could be any different in Chinese? That is if they were to incorporate all 3000 characters. I know they don't because that would be a daunting task and take a year to write one page of anything. But just food for thought.
mumbles76
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mumbles76,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/6/2015 | 10:37:23 PM
Chinese Passwords.
Depending on which dynasty and period of history, there were as much as 55,000 Chinese characters. Today there are just about 7000 in literature.

Speaking-wise,  the average Chinese citizen has memorized between 2600 and 5000 for normal usage.

The reality is, chinese use a lot of ascii characters for their passwords, 123456 is just as common there as it is here due to the laziness factor around the world. Typing 123456 in Chinese takes more time than it does in ascii form.

There are cultural factors at play as well, 8 is a lucky number in Chinese culture, therefore it's used a lot. '168' combination has some lucky meaning behind it as well. A lot of passwords are pinyin (Chinese spelled out in English) and other phonetic translations into ascii.

I found this after you piqued my interest in the subject (Warning: Extremely thorough):

researchgate.net/publication/269101022_Understanding_Passwords_of_Chinese_Users_Characteristics_Security_and_Implications

 

 

 

 
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