Operations

1/26/2018
01:30 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

6 Tips for Building a Data Privacy Culture

Experts say it's not enough to just post data classification guidelines and revisit the topic once a year. Companies have to build in privacy by design.
Previous
1 of 7
Next

(Image: Alfa Photo, via Shutterstock)
(Image: Alfa Photo, via Shutterstock)

Given the expanding threat landscape, security professionals may think that the public at large doesn't have a good grip on what counts as sensitive information.

But MediaPro's 2018 Eye On Privacy Report shows that the industry has made some progress.

For example, 89% of US employees rank Social Security numbers as most sensitive on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the most sensitive. And another 76% rank credit card information as most sensitive.

Other evidence that employees are more aware than in the past: 87% chose to correctly store a project proposal for a new client and design specifications for a new product in a locked drawer. And nearly three-quarters of all respondents chose to either destroy an old password hint and an ex-employee’s tax form from three decades ago in a secure shredder.

"While we've made progress, I have to wonder about the 11% who didn't rate a Social Security number as most sensitive," says Tom Pendergast, chief strategist for security, privacy and compliance at MediaPro. "It would seem to me that the Equifax case from last year would have sufficiently alarmed people."

In honor of Data Privacy Day on January 28, here are key steps for creating a corporate culture of data privacy, based on interviews with MediaPro’s Pendergast and Russell Schrader, the new executive director of the National Cyber Security Alliance. 

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 7
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Government Shutdown Brings Certificate Lapse Woes
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  1/11/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security 2018
This Dark Reading Tech Digest explores the biggest news stories of 2018 that shaped the cybersecurity landscape.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-9276
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
SmarterTools SmarterMail before 13.3.5535 was vulnerable to stored XSS by bypassing the anti-XSS mechanisms. It was possible to run JavaScript code when a victim user opens or replies to the attacker's email, which contained a malicious payload. Therefore, users' passwords could be reset by using an...
CVE-2015-9277
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
MailEnable before 8.60 allows Directory Traversal for reading the messages of other users, uploading files, and deleting files because "/../" and "/.. /" are mishandled.
CVE-2015-9278
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
MailEnable before 8.60 allows Privilege Escalation because admin accounts could be created as a consequence of %0A mishandling in AUTH.TAB after a password-change request.
CVE-2015-9279
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
MailEnable before 8.60 allows Stored XSS via malformed use of "<img/src" with no ">" character in the body of an e-mail message.
CVE-2015-9280
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-16
MailEnable before 8.60 allows XXE via an XML document in the request.aspx Options parameter.