Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Operations

2/8/2019
02:00 PM

6 Reasons to Be Wary of Encryption in Your Enterprise

Encryption can be critical to data security, but it's not a universal panacea.
7 of 7

Encryption Needs a Plan
When an organization implements encryption, it needs to be done seriously, soberly, and without undue haste. Of course, that's true of most enterprise IT, but the consequences of getting encryption spectacularly wrong can be dire, indeed.
One of the recent examples of very poor planning comes from the Canadian cryptocurrency exchange, whose CEO kept encryption keys on his encrypted laptop. That was fine, until he suddenly died - without telling anyone else the key to his laptop. Now critical information is securely locked away, never to be seen again (unless a skilled white hat can work a bit of magic on the system).
This really gets back to this notion that encryption is complicated. It's easy for executives, and even some IT professionals, to believe that encryption is no more complicated than clicking a couple of text boxes, remembering a (strong) password, and enjoying total security.  But, like virtually every aspect of cybersecurity, encryption requires analysis, planning, and careful implementation. Then, and only then, can anyone sit back and enjoy improved security.
(Image: Tuomas Kujansuu via Adobe Stock)

Encryption Needs a Plan

When an organization implements encryption, it needs to be done seriously, soberly, and without undue haste. Of course, that's true of most enterprise IT, but the consequences of getting encryption spectacularly wrong can be dire, indeed.

One of the recent examples of very poor planning comes from the Canadian cryptocurrency exchange, whose CEO kept encryption keys on his encrypted laptop. That was fine, until he suddenly died without telling anyone else the key to his laptop. Now critical information is securely locked away, never to be seen again (unless a skilled white hat can work a bit of magic on the system).

This really gets back to this notion that encryption is complicated. It's easy for executives, and even some IT professionals, to believe that encryption is no more complicated than clicking a couple of text boxes, remembering a (strong) password, and enjoying total security. But, like virtually every aspect of cybersecurity, encryption requires analysis, planning, and careful implementation. Then, and only then, can anyone sit back and enjoy improved security.

(Image: Tuomas Kujansuu via Adobe Stock)

7 of 7
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
davinoishi
100%
0%
davinoishi,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/12/2019 | 11:35:33 AM
Transparent Encryption
While file and volume encryption have limits, there are transparent solutions available that allow information to remain encrypted even in use.
Where Businesses Waste Endpoint Security Budgets
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  7/15/2019
How Attackers Infiltrate the Supply Chain & What to Do About It
Shay Nahari, Head of Red-Team Services at CyberArk,  7/16/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
Building and Managing an IT Security Operations Program
As cyber threats grow, many organizations are building security operations centers (SOCs) to improve their defenses. In this Tech Digest you will learn tips on how to get the most out of a SOC in your organization - and what to do if you can't afford to build one.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-13961
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-18
A CSRF vulnerability was found in flatCore before 1.5, leading to the upload of arbitrary .php files via acp/core/files.upload-script.php.
CVE-2019-13962
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-18
lavc_CopyPicture in modules/codec/avcodec/video.c in VideoLAN VLC media player through 3.0.7 has a heap-based buffer over-read because it does not properly validate the width and height.
CVE-2019-10101
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-18
OECMS v4.3.R60321 and v4.3 later is affected by: Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF). The impact is: The victim clicks on adding an administrator account. The component is: admincp.php. The attack vector is: network connectivity. The fixed version is: v4.3.
CVE-2019-10102
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-18
MailCleaner before c888fbb6aaa7c5f8400f637bcf1cbb844de46cd9 is affected by: Unauthenticated MySQL database password information disclosure. The impact is: MySQL database content disclosure (e.g. username, password). The component is: The API call in the function allowAction() in NewslettersControlle...
CVE-2019-10102
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-18
Open Information Security Foundation Suricata prior to version 4.1.3 is affected by: Denial of Service - TCP/HTTP detection bypass. The impact is: An attacker can evade a signature detection with a specialy formed sequence of network packets. The component is: detect.c (https://github.com/OISF/suric...